Tt’s, by (im)perfect

Designer Mur Tarragona

“tit’s” is an artistic project created together with Naomi Thellier de Poncheville. The claim is “choose yourself, choose your friend’s, choose who you please – who pleases you” Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and the very idea of what is beautiful or perfect is relative – never absolute. Celebrating all the diversity and singularity in the female form, we have created a catalogue of women’s breasts – releasing a collection of t-shirts and artworks to be sported and exhibited with pride.

Tarragona00Project created with Naomi Thellier de Poncheville for an itinerant exhibition celebrating womanhood, developed in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) and launched in Barcelona (Catalonia).

Concept:
“Choose yourself, choose your friend’s, choose who you please – who pleases you”.

Under this idea we created a collection of artwork celebrating the beauty in the diversity and singularity of the female form. A limited series of screen printed t-shirts was created adorning different women’s breasts.

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Several catalogues were printed – referencing those that one might find in a breast implant clinic. These catalogues archived over a hundred busts of varying sizes, from different ages and nationalities.

Tarragona05

Copyright info: AttributionNon-commercial
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About plastic surgery

Marie-Lou Desmeules is an artist who uses pure pigment to transform living models into bizarre sculptures of surreal celebrity lookalikes. Her work refers in particular to plastic surgery which often for some reason or another, didn’t exactly go as anticipated. We can read in her work a veiled complaint to reality television, which imposed this kind of beauty.

The art of glitches by Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar, is an artist from Canada. She uses images from encyclopedias, biology textbooks, featuring sexy pinups, children, politician-on-TV subject matters, but each gives off an air of american antiquity. Then search the glitch effect she wants by using a scanner; moving the image while that is being scanned, the results are distorted figures. “By mashing up these two technologies, I want to highlight the obsolescence of the old one and the future obsolescence of the new one”. She thinks that the most stylish pictures are the kitchest ones.

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

Nancy Davidson’s sculptures challenge absurd body ideals

Nancy Davidson creates massive inflatable sculptures that resemble an unbridled body, ballooned and bulging. Combining pop culture kitsch with a feminist spirit and carnivalesque sense of humor, the artist specializes in a visceral language of bellies, bumps and lovely lady lumps, harnessing the bodily force of the human form in a minimalist range of colors and shapes.

Many of the sculptures begin with a weather balloon that the artist blows up with a nozzle. Then she goes to work, squeezing and binding and smushing the round orbs into various bodacious configurations.

For example, “Blue Moon” (below) resembles a belly and butt bursting from a corset trying desperately to restrain them, while another recalls fishnet stockings winding their way up impossibly long legs. Through abstraction, Davidson creates images so physical you may find yourself needing to swallow, as sometimes perusing erotic materials makes one forget to breathe.

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/feminist-artist-brings-minimalist-sculpture-to-bootylicious-new-heights_us_5748ad57e4b03ede4414d77a?utm_hp_ref=female-artists]

The photographer who normalizes women’s imperfect bodies

After a slew of instagram hate following her body positive imagery depicting women’s body hair went viral, it would have been easy for Seattle based photographer Ashley Armitage to take a step back from her bare-all approach to photography. But this online hate didn’t deter her from portraying a realistic, photoshop free depiction of the female form. Instead of bowing to the trolls, Armitage decided to push the boundaries of beauty standards further, shooting stretch marks, scars, spots and more.

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage

“I create images of the female body because historically these images have been controlled by men. We were always the painted and not the painters. I’m trying to take back what’s ours and explore what it means to have a body that has always been defined by a male hand”– Ashley Armitage

[http://www.dazeddigital.com/photography/article/29017/1/the-photographer-normalising-our-imperfect-bodies]

Photo series by Sheila Pree morphs real women with Barbie

We’ve seen what a Barbie doll would look like if modeled after the average 19-year-old woman. But when you juxtapose a doll’s facial features with a real woman’s, the results are startling.

That’s what photographer Sheila Pree Bright did in her 2003 series “Plastic Bodies,” which is currently part of the traveling art show “Posing Beauty in African American Culture.” Pree Bright’s work focuses mostly on women of color, exploring their complex relationships to white beauty standards by combining images of real women’s bodies and faces with those of dolls.

“American concepts of the “perfect female body” are clearly exemplified through commercialism, portraying “image as everything” and introducing trends that many spend hundreds of dollars to imitate. It is more common than ever that women are enlarging breasts with silicone, making short hair longer with synthetic hair weaves, covering natural nails with acrylic fill-ins, or perhaps replacing natural eyes with contacts.

Even on magazine covers, graphic artists are airbrushing and manipulating photographs in software programs, making the image of a small waist and clear skin flawless. As a result, the female body becomes a replica of a doll, and the essence of natural beauty in popular American culture is replaced by fantasy.”

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/22/plastic-bodies-sheila-pree-bright-beauty-identity_n_4324403.html]

It’s not easy… it’s never easy.

Giusy Versace is a well-known Italy’s champion para-athlete : She lost her legs in an accident, but she kept her persistance and determination.

Giusy Versace – www.giusyversace.it – Maurizio pighizzini

“It’s hard to confront yourself with the daily physical pain. Prosthetics, after all, aren’t your legs. So you wake up with a biting pain in different parts of your body,” the 30-something Italian says, pointing at her tummy and hips, “You can’t walk exactly like you walked yesterday. It’s different, every day.”

 

GIUSY VERSACE – WWW.GIUSYVERSACE.IT – Mjriam bon

 

Other Sources Gulf Times

 Giada Semeraro

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo was a Mexican painter.
A terrible event, September 17, 1925, at the age of 18, his life changed dramatically and locked her in a deep loneliness that had only art as a uniquewindow on the world. The bus ended up crushed against a wall. The injuries werevery serious for Frida: if the spine broke in three places in the lumbar region; He shattered the femoral neck and ribs; the left leg reported 11 fractures; The right footwas dislocated and crushed; the left shoulder dislocated and remained the pelvic bone broken in three places. In addition, a bus handrail went into her hip and went out of the vagina. In the course of his life he had to endure many as 32 surgicaloperations. Released from the hospital, she was forced to years of resting in bed at home, with the bust in plaster. This situation prompted her to read books on thecommunist movement and to paint.
CAROLINA MONACO

Revolutional Art

Arte Povera is a modern art movement. The term was coined by Italian art critic Germano Celant and introduced in Italy during the period of upheaval at the end of the 1960s, when artists were taking a radical stance. Artists began attacking the values of established institutions of government, industry, and culture.

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Michelangelo Pistoletto, Venere degli stracci, 1967

Eleonora Formiconi

Cindy Sherman: the masquerade of identity

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Untitled Film Still #15. 1978

Gelatin silver print, 9 7/16 x 7 1/2″ (24 x 19.1 cm).The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Barbara and Eugene Schwartz in honor of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder.© 2012 Cindy Sherman

 

The American feminist artist Cindy Sherman (1954)  “emerged onto the New York art scene in the early 1980s as part of a new generatio
n of artists concerned with the codes of representation in a media-saturated era” .
She posed in different stereotypical female roles, she’s got plenty of subjective emotions she can exploit through the media: In photograph after photograph, Sherman was ever present with different costumes. She wants to overturn the trend of the american society based on appearence and consumption,ready to celebrate the product and not its producer.

“Throughout her career, Sherman has appropriated numerous visual genres—including the film still, centerfold, fashion photograph, historical portrait, and soft-core sex image—while disrupting the operations that work to define and maintain their respective codes of representation.[…]

Cindy Sherman’s Untitled Film Stills (1977–80) have been canonized as a hallmark of postmodernist art, which frequently utilized mass-media codes and techniques of representation in order to comment on contemporary society.[…]  Sherman’s stills have an artifice that is heightened by the often visible camera cord, slightly eccentric props, unusual camera angles, and by the fact that each image includes the artist, rather than a recognizable actress or model.”

From: http://www.guggenheim.org/


Portraits
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Untitled #359. 2000

Chromogenic color print, 30 x 20″ (76.2 x 50.8 cm). Courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. © 2012 Cindy Sherman

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Untitled #360. 2000

Chromogenic color print, 30 x 20″ (76.2 x 50.8 cm). Stefan T. Edlis Collection.
© 2012 Cindy Sherman
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Untitled #408. 2002

Chromogenic color print, 54 x 36″ (137.2 x 91.4 cm). Collection of Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond J. Learsy. © 2012 Cindy Sherman

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Untitled #132. 1984

Chromogenic color print, 67 x 47″ (170.2 x 199.4 cm). Collection of John Cheim.
© 2012 Cindy Sherman

With bright light and high-contrast color, Sherman focuses on the consequences of society’s stereotyped roles for women — in this case as a victim of fashion — rather than upon the roles themselves.

Giada Semeraro

Body Art: Shirin Neshat

Shirin Neshat  is an iranian artist of contemporary visual art, known for her work in film, video and photography.

Shirin looks beyond the role of the women, she wants to branch off in the pure identity of each people. The heart of her artistic search see the body as a way to communicate a social condition, the contrasts between Islam and the West, femininity and masculinity, public life and private life, antiquity and modernity..

She is able to shake us with mute stories.

From:
Gladstone gallery


Zarin Series, 2005 ; C-print 47 1/2 x 60 inches (120.7 x 152.4 cm)


Nida (Patriots), from The Book of Kings series, 2012 ; Ink on LE silver gelatin print 60 x 45 inches (152.4 x 114.3 cm)


Muhammed (Patriots), from The Book of Kings series, 2012
Ink on LE silver gelatin print 60 x 45 inches (152.4 x 114.3 cm)


Bahram (Villians), from The Book of Kings series, 2012 ; Ink on LE silver gelatin print      99 x 49 1/2 inches (251.5 x 125.7 cm)


Untitled, 1996 ; RC print & ink (photo taken by Larry Barns)

Giada Semeraro

“Regular Women” campaign

According to Chrystal Bougon, owner of plus-size lingerie store Curvy Girl, “There are so many pictures of models in lingerie, but I’m constantly asked for pictures of our products on ‘regular’ bodies… In the fashion world, anything over size 4 is considered plus-size. I know, it’s a big joke.”

Bougon stated: “Inspired by a customer, I wanted to show that women with rolls, bumps, lumps, scars, stretch marks, surgery scars and natural breasts that have nursed babies can be stunning and beautiful.” And women have responded in full-force, posting their own photos to Curvy Girl’s Facebook page in high numbers.


curvy girl lingerie

curvy girls

Source: Huffington Post

Large Labia Project

“I have medium-large labia. I have meaty outer lips, & long thick inner lips. And my inner labia are different sizes. I love my labia. But some women don’t love theirs. Many women see unrealistic images and listen to misguided opinions and think their labia should be neat, small & invisible to be “normal”. This blog is all about fighting that view, by showing how perfectly normal and beautiful large labia are. Really they’re nothing special though, the average woman has them! Anyway I’ll show you mine & feel free to submit yours”.
Large Labia Project

Source: http://largelabiaproject.org/

Our Breasts

Our Breasts “celebrates the beautiful diversity of natural breasts, of all sizes, shapes, colours, ages and races. Breasts are such an important and integral part of what makes us feel feminine, sexual, and real women. By showing how all women are different, and uniquely special, as a gender we will be able to challenge the beliefs around what makes breasts beautiful. And in turn, we will be able to help women feel better about themselves. Help show the beauty of all women by contributing your breasts to this project”.Hi Emma, I’ve previously submitted to your large labia project tumblr, yet somehow I am finding submitting my breasts a hundred times more nerve-wracking. I guess boobs are so much more “out there”, whereas a vulva is still relatively rare outside porn! And everybody loves to have an opinion on boobs… I’m 39, and a 34A-B ish, depending on the time of the month. I’ve breast-fed two children. I used to hate being small, although I eventually came to realise that there are some advantages, specifically around clothing. After all, it is easier to add padding than it is to reduce breasts! However, while I’ve come to accept their size, on rare bad days I can still feel self-conscious about their shape - I’d love them to be a bit rounder and less tubular.  So thank you for this site, where I can remind myself on such days that we don’t all look like porn stars, and that actually that’s pretty cool.  x______________ Thanks for sharing your pretty breasts and being so brave. You’re wonderful, and really gorgeous. Honestly, I love your yummy mummy boobs. Be proud of them!!! :) Emmaxo

Source: http://ourbreasts.tumblr.com/

The imperfection’s nonsense.

”Donna Moderna”,an italian magazine published an article about the imperfection. In this article imperfection is defined as the beauty nonsense. In this article the theme of imperfection is close to fashion trends. As far as hair,if in one hand there is the trend to be precise,on the other hand,there is the trend to be uncombed. As far as make-up trends, on one hand there is the trends to be very pefect and precise,on the other hand,lof of women prefer to be shade.
So in this article there is a question:Where is imperfection? What is imperfection?.
In this article the fashion model Daphne Groeneveld is considered the imperfection’s example.

 

http://www.donnamoderna.com/bellezza/viso-e-corpo/trend-2012-trucco-capelli/foto-11

Ugly Betty: Imperfection Vs Perfection.

‘Ugly Betty” is a telefilm,in which the main character,Betty Suarez,is a journalist for a fashion magazione Mode. She is not beautiful,in fact she wear glasses and brace and she wear a lot of clothes that aren’t very beauty,but ugly.
In opposition to Betty there is Wilhelmina Slater who is beauty and who wear very good clothes.
For this reason, there is a competition between beauty: in fact,both of them represetn a style of beauty: Betty can be considered beautifully imperfect and Wilhelmina Slater
can be considered as beautifully perfect.. So in this telefilm there are perfection and imperfection.
Betty,during all episode starts to change and in the end she isn’t very ugly,but become beauty. So,the imperfection can be considered a character of this TV series. In addiction,there is also another thing to say: The actress who play the rule of Betty is America Ferrera. She is the opposite of Betty as far as the external asperct.