About plastic surgery

Marie-Lou Desmeules is an artist who uses pure pigment to transform living models into bizarre sculptures of surreal celebrity lookalikes. Her work refers in particular to plastic surgery which often for some reason or another, didn’t exactly go as anticipated. We can read in her work a veiled complaint to reality television, which imposed this kind of beauty.

The art of glitches by Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar, is an artist from Canada. She uses images from encyclopedias, biology textbooks, featuring sexy pinups, children, politician-on-TV subject matters, but each gives off an air of american antiquity. Then search the glitch effect she wants by using a scanner; moving the image while that is being scanned, the results are distorted figures. “By mashing up these two technologies, I want to highlight the obsolescence of the old one and the future obsolescence of the new one”. She thinks that the most stylish pictures are the kitchest ones.

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

The beauty of diversity

Michelle Marshall is a french photographer. During her career she decided to document the incidence of the MC1R gene mutation responsible for red hair and freckles, particularly amongst black/mixed raced individuals of all ages. The gene is recessive, which means both parents need to have it, in order for the child to receive it. Marshall wanted to show the stereotype of the redhead is not representative for all people who enjoy their red strands. Her work is really interesting.

The photographer who normalizes women’s imperfect bodies

After a slew of instagram hate following her body positive imagery depicting women’s body hair went viral, it would have been easy for Seattle based photographer Ashley Armitage to take a step back from her bare-all approach to photography. But this online hate didn’t deter her from portraying a realistic, photoshop free depiction of the female form. Instead of bowing to the trolls, Armitage decided to push the boundaries of beauty standards further, shooting stretch marks, scars, spots and more.

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage

“I create images of the female body because historically these images have been controlled by men. We were always the painted and not the painters. I’m trying to take back what’s ours and explore what it means to have a body that has always been defined by a male hand”– Ashley Armitage

[http://www.dazeddigital.com/photography/article/29017/1/the-photographer-normalising-our-imperfect-bodies]

Play- Doh portraits by Jose Cardoso

Jose Cardoso’s work looks scary but surely it is really interesting.

“There’s a lot of theories about identity loss nowadays, about how social networks can help you fake your real identity, why do people use photoshop in order to hide imperfections but never use that tool to enhance deficiencies?”

This work could be refered also to how easy is to get plastic surgery to your face like it was made of Play-Doh.

These photos are open to a variety of interpretations.

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/play-doh-portraits-jose-cardoso_us_5734e23fe4b08f96c18294c4?utm_hp_ref=photography]

Distorted Scotch Tape Portraits by Wes Naman

One year ago, a New Mexico-based photographer Wes Naman was wrapping Christmas gifts with his assistant and started goofing around with the scotch tape. The artist immediately had an idea that after a year developed into the“Scotch Tape” portrait series, where volunteers put the tape around their faces to create terrifying and just absolutely hilarious expressions. Noses and lips get bent, and Wes also likes to stretch people’s eyebrows to make the eyes pop out – the final results are so bizarre that hardly any retouching is needed!

[http://www.boredpanda.com/scotch-tape-portraits-wes-naman/]

Edward Honaker documents his own depression

Twenty one-year-old photographer Edward Honaker documents his own depression in powerful self-portraits. The series of black and white images illustrates the photographer’s experience with depression and anxiety.

In an attempt to raise awareness of the topic, Honaker says about the project:

Mental health disorders are such a taboo topic.

If you ever bring it up in conversation, people awkwardly get silent, or try to tell you why it’s not a real problem.

When I was in the worst parts of depression, the most helpful thing anyone could have done was to just listen to me – not judging, not trying to find a solution, just listen.

I’m hoping that these images will help open up conversation about mental health issues.

Everyone is or will be affected by them one way or another, and ignoring them doesn’t make things better. 

It’s kind of hard to feel any kind of emotion when you’re depressed, and I think good art can definitely move people”

Edward’s face is blurred or covered in all of the haunting black and white photos, which are meant to portray the helplessness felt by someone who is battling a depressive disorder. 

“All I knew is that I became bad at the things I used to be good at, and I didn’t know why” Edward recalled of the time before his diagnosis. Your mind is who you are, and when it doesn’t work properly, it’s scary” he noted. 

The Honaker’s series of mental illness portraits are a powerful reminder that while each individual’s experience with depression is personal, the feelings can be universal.

http://www.edwardhonaker.com/booktwo/

http://edwardandrew.tumblr.com/About

The Beauty Of Imperfection

Daniel Martin Dutch artist and illustrator, creates portraits from the sinister glamor and looking ominous. The faces portraits are intentionally damaged after the realization, highlighting a broader concept of beauty, which encloses also the existence imperfection and therefore error.

His brushstrokes aware and at the same time instinctive and spontaneous conquer the spectator, who remains totally enraptured by the sense of chaos and order that emerges from the work of this sensitive artist.

Daniel-Martin-2-e1441888145267 Daniel-Martin-6-e1441888137123 Daniel-Martin-9-e1441888129525

Luca Malafarina

Amanda Clyne, the portrait of imperfection


Split Screen, 36″ x 54″, oil on canvas, 2011, Private Collection

“Inspired by fashion and the history of painting, my work examines the image as a mirror of our desires. Amidst today’s cultural fascination with beauty and persona, my paintings critique our digital obsession and question the consequences for human intimacy.
When the viewer first glances at one of my paintings, the image and viewer lock eyes. The image stares back with a shifting, slivered gaze, appealing to the viewer to seek resolution of its ever-elusive form. Confronted with irreconcilable fragments or impenetrable blind spots, the viewer struggles to answer the image’s plea. Savoring the seductive exchange, the viewer and image become entwined in an active portrait of the experience of looking.

I begin my process by culling images from fashion magazines and art history books, intrigued by the similarities I see between contemporary fashion photography and historical portraits of society’s elite — images intended to fuel a spectacle of desire with feigned promises of intimacy and truth.
Cropping the image into a portrait, I re-print the image on to a surface to which the ink does not adhere, photographing the print as the fluid image morphs and dissolves over time.  I then compose a new image from fragments of these photographs.  I paint this final image as a large-scale painting, the shifting, slivered fragments offering yet denying the viewer resolution of a now elusive form.”

Source: amandaclyne.com