About plastic surgery

Marie-Lou Desmeules is an artist who uses pure pigment to transform living models into bizarre sculptures of surreal celebrity lookalikes. Her work refers in particular to plastic surgery which often for some reason or another, didn’t exactly go as anticipated. We can read in her work a veiled complaint to reality television, which imposed this kind of beauty.

The art of glitches by Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar, is an artist from Canada. She uses images from encyclopedias, biology textbooks, featuring sexy pinups, children, politician-on-TV subject matters, but each gives off an air of american antiquity. Then search the glitch effect she wants by using a scanner; moving the image while that is being scanned, the results are distorted figures. “By mashing up these two technologies, I want to highlight the obsolescence of the old one and the future obsolescence of the new one”. She thinks that the most stylish pictures are the kitchest ones.

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

The beauty of diversity

Michelle Marshall is a french photographer. During her career she decided to document the incidence of the MC1R gene mutation responsible for red hair and freckles, particularly amongst black/mixed raced individuals of all ages. The gene is recessive, which means both parents need to have it, in order for the child to receive it. Marshall wanted to show the stereotype of the redhead is not representative for all people who enjoy their red strands. Her work is really interesting.

Christian Richter shows the beauty in ruins

“When I was young, I fell in love with abandoned buildings. After I got a camera as a present, I started photographing the beauty there. I mostly photograph empty buildings with great staircases or interiors.”

“I simply adore old decaying architecture, their patterns and textures – they remind me that everything is impermanent. Abandoned architecture photography is my ongoing project and I often travel around Europe looking for abandoned buildings.”

[http://www.boredpanda.com/abandoned-buildings-urban-decay-photography-christian-richter/]

The photographer who normalizes women’s imperfect bodies

After a slew of instagram hate following her body positive imagery depicting women’s body hair went viral, it would have been easy for Seattle based photographer Ashley Armitage to take a step back from her bare-all approach to photography. But this online hate didn’t deter her from portraying a realistic, photoshop free depiction of the female form. Instead of bowing to the trolls, Armitage decided to push the boundaries of beauty standards further, shooting stretch marks, scars, spots and more.

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage

“I create images of the female body because historically these images have been controlled by men. We were always the painted and not the painters. I’m trying to take back what’s ours and explore what it means to have a body that has always been defined by a male hand”– Ashley Armitage

[http://www.dazeddigital.com/photography/article/29017/1/the-photographer-normalising-our-imperfect-bodies]

The strange beauty of pollution

The Gowanus Canal is a Brooklyn waterway that, during the Industrial Revolution in the mid-19th century and beyond, served as a receptacle of waste for the various companies that fueled the way.

Specifically, the canal served as a dumping ground for coal tar, a thick, black liquid containing benzene, naphthalene, phenols, aniline and a bunch of other hazardous chemical compounds. After it was no longer needed, the canal was left to fester, and the tar substance seeped underground, floated to the surface, and interspersed itself throughout the fetid body of water, yielding a virulent stench and strangely stunning visuals.

Today, the Gowanus Canal is one of the most polluted bodies of water in the country, and was declared a Superfund site in 2010. In 2013, a dolphin even died in its toxic grip.

When photographer Steven Hirsch, a Brooklyn native, saw the channel for the first time in 2010, he was enthralled. During his initial visit, an eruption of oil started bubbling and erupting on the water’s surface with a bizarre cocktail of centuries-old pollutants. Hirsch pulled out his camera and braved the nauseating smell to capture the strange visual effect, like a metallic Impressionist artwork.

The images are at once haunting and oddly hypnotic, illuminating the disastrous results of unchecked contamination left out to rot, and the strange visual complexity that arises from such hazardous destruction. In the images, emerald green, metallic gold and electric aquamarine dance in abstract patterns that seem brewed from the imagination. It’s hard to believe these organic-looking shapes are the result of human waste and carelessness.

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/mesmerizing-photos-of-the-gowanus-canal-capture-the-dark-reality-and-strange-beauty-of-pollution_us_56e2fb6ae4b065e2e3d5c056?utm_hp_ref=photography]

Play- Doh portraits by Jose Cardoso

Jose Cardoso’s work looks scary but surely it is really interesting.

“There’s a lot of theories about identity loss nowadays, about how social networks can help you fake your real identity, why do people use photoshop in order to hide imperfections but never use that tool to enhance deficiencies?”

This work could be refered also to how easy is to get plastic surgery to your face like it was made of Play-Doh.

These photos are open to a variety of interpretations.

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/play-doh-portraits-jose-cardoso_us_5734e23fe4b08f96c18294c4?utm_hp_ref=photography]

Photosculptures by Brno del Zou

Brno del Zou is an artist and a photographer who uses an interesting fragment style which highlights all parts of a human face. In his “photosculptures” series, Brno Del Zou uses the fragmentation of the body in order to better understand it. The body and the faces are revisited and their volumes are highlighted in order to create installations of multiple scales. These “photosculptures” suggest a clear aesthetic preference which does not hide the chaotic side of our minds.

Photo series by Sheila Pree morphs real women with Barbie

We’ve seen what a Barbie doll would look like if modeled after the average 19-year-old woman. But when you juxtapose a doll’s facial features with a real woman’s, the results are startling.

That’s what photographer Sheila Pree Bright did in her 2003 series “Plastic Bodies,” which is currently part of the traveling art show “Posing Beauty in African American Culture.” Pree Bright’s work focuses mostly on women of color, exploring their complex relationships to white beauty standards by combining images of real women’s bodies and faces with those of dolls.

“American concepts of the “perfect female body” are clearly exemplified through commercialism, portraying “image as everything” and introducing trends that many spend hundreds of dollars to imitate. It is more common than ever that women are enlarging breasts with silicone, making short hair longer with synthetic hair weaves, covering natural nails with acrylic fill-ins, or perhaps replacing natural eyes with contacts.

Even on magazine covers, graphic artists are airbrushing and manipulating photographs in software programs, making the image of a small waist and clear skin flawless. As a result, the female body becomes a replica of a doll, and the essence of natural beauty in popular American culture is replaced by fantasy.”

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/22/plastic-bodies-sheila-pree-bright-beauty-identity_n_4324403.html]

Awesome Split Personality Portraits Through Clever Styling

For a recent assignment, Sydney-based photographer Toby Dixon created these two awesome split personality portraits not with fancy Photoshop but with the help of two talented friends. Monique Moynihan, who was in charge of styling and Budi, who handled make-up, transformed a man and a woman each into two distinct halves.

Similar to a mullet, “business in the front, party in the back,” these side by side characters couldn’t be more different. While the studious, bow-tie and pearls-wearing side seems more than a little serious, the tattoo-sporting, red lipstick-wearing party side is all about letting loose.

Dixon proudly states about this project, “No cutting, no comping, no Photoshop trickery.”

[http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/toby-dixon-split-personality-portraits]

Distorted Scotch Tape Portraits by Wes Naman

One year ago, a New Mexico-based photographer Wes Naman was wrapping Christmas gifts with his assistant and started goofing around with the scotch tape. The artist immediately had an idea that after a year developed into the“Scotch Tape” portrait series, where volunteers put the tape around their faces to create terrifying and just absolutely hilarious expressions. Noses and lips get bent, and Wes also likes to stretch people’s eyebrows to make the eyes pop out – the final results are so bizarre that hardly any retouching is needed!

[http://www.boredpanda.com/scotch-tape-portraits-wes-naman/]

Can you read my face?

Two artists have created a portrait series of people who appear to have had cosmetic surgery.

However, the models’ nips and tucks are actually cut-outs from magazines.

Poking fun at the fashion industry, French artists Bruno Metra and Laurence Jeanson stick images of facial features, cut out from fashion magazines, over the models’ eyes, lips and noses to form new facial expressions.

Artists Perform Plastic Surgery With MagazinesModel
The artists say that the project, called ID, shows how beauty is no longer natural but socially conditioned.

Professional photographer Bruno Metra, 45, said: ‘In the media we are bombarded by images of others.

‘Magazines, cinema and television keep creating and imposing codes that become social references.

Models

models

‘What one must look like, how to wear make-up, what clothes to wear, how to behave.

Laurence and I are fascinated by the power of the media and how it influences people’s identities.

‘The act of representation has taken over what’s real; models erase themselves in order to gain another self.

‘Here we are portraying identities weakened by the diktat of appearance.’

[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2303593/Can-read-face-Artists-distort-faces-magazine-pictures-create-bizarre-expressions.html]

Shinichi Maruyama’s Nudes

Shinichi Maruyama exemplifies the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi–the beauty of things imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete. In his work, he captures the underlying principle of energetic interactions between forms. The artist first started halting the passage of time through images of suspended liquids forms intending to collide in mid-air. In his series Nudes, Maruyama has more recently collaborated with dancers to create a sense of motion in a single photograph, through layering different frames. In its spatial illusionism and meticulous details, he inevitably points to a vortex of visual forms and sensations, where spontaneity and control stand in perfect balance. The artist’s status lies in his ability to create a new abstract visual language that generates motion and stillness in perpetuum.

[http://www.brucesilverstein.com/artists/shinichi-maruyama]

Ashkan Honarvar’s War Faces

The fact that the wounds on these men’s faces are made of candy and ice cream makes them oddly unsettling. Utrecth-based artist, Ashkan Honarvar’s Facesseries seems to beautify what is inherently absent from fatal or horribly disfiguring wounds inflicted by soldiers during war.

Ashkan says his work, “constitutes a search for a universal representation of the evil latent in every human, providing an opportunity for reflection. His aesthetic dissection has an intriguing macabre nature, which opens the images to interpretation.

[http://streetanatomy.com/2012/06/16/ashkan-honarvars-war-faces/]

Ashkan Honarvar Faces 5 (4)

Ashkan Honarvar Faces 5 (1)

Ashkan Honarvar Faces 5 (3)

 

True Photography

In Berengo Gardin’s view,being a photographer means playing an observer’s role and adopting a sympathetic listening stance in the face of reality,a characteristic that he shares with all of the great reporter photograhers of the 20th century. And indeed in recent years he has always been in the front line in an effort to tell us what needed changing and what needed celebrating.
As a photographer he is devoted to recording reality in the round,leaving no stone unturned. He took this photos between 2013 and 2014, portraying the ordinary life in Venice: Large cruise ships cross the lagoon. She was troubled by visual pollution.

L’Espresso
Palazzo delle esposizioni

Giada Semeraro

A large ship,leaving the basin of san marco
view from Via Garibaldi, Venice – April 2013 © Gianni Berengo Gardin – Fondazione Forma per la Fotografia

Giudecca, Venice, aprile 2013 © Gianni Berengo Gardin – Fondazione Forma per la Fotografia

 

Giudecca,venice © Gianni Berengo Gardin –  Fondazione Forma per la Fotografia

 

GIUDECCA,venice © GIANNI BERENGO GARDIN –  FONDAZIONE FORMA PER LA FOTOGRAFIA

Nan Goldin’s ‘Ballad of Sexual Dependency’

When Aperture published Nan Goldin’s The Ballad of Sexual Dependency three decades ago, the artist was met with brutal criticism; she was told, mostly by men, that her slideshow of images was not photography. The young photographer, then in her early thirties, didn’t pay them any heed. In conversation with Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, she admits that quite frankly, she “didn’t care about good photography.” Maybe that fact is paradoxically what makes her photographs so painfully good, even thirty years later.
Goldin created The Ballad to remember, to safeguard the things and the people that happened to her from being glossed over with the rosy tinge of nostalgia. The Ballad honors the bad and the beautiful, the tender and the violent, in equal measure, illuminating the ways in which the human race is both hopeless in relationships and hopeful in love.

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The book on vimeo 

 

Gloria Colaianni

Francesca Woodman

Francesca Woodman committed suicide at age 23. She was a famous photographer. Despite her photos are very interesting and fascinating,
She wanted to represent dead, anxiety, depression and sadness through domestic architecture , claustrophobic space of the rooms open to an interior dimension. The body is main element: it enters into a relationship with the objects that surround it.
The headless portraits , blurry images , bodies in motion evade from reality.

Chiara Barbera

Ouka Leele

She was born in Madrid in 1957, under her real name of Bárbara Allende Gil de Biedma. She was interested in painting since childhood, although she decided to train as a photographer. She mastered the technique, and at the age of 18 various of her photographs were included in the book ‘Principio’, together with other promising young photographers, and published in the specialist magazines ‘Zoom’ and ‘Nueva Lente’. In 1978 the magazine ‘Star’ asked her to create a colour photograph for its front cover, and as she specialised in black and white photography she decided to use a technique from the beginning of the century consisting of colouring the photograph with bright watercolours.

Ouka Leele wanted to be a painter but discovered photography as another medium of looking at figurative work. At a unique moment in Spanish history in the aftermath of Franco’s death, she invented a fresh and original way of looking at images.
With great ease she became a part of the nation’s “movida Madrileña” movement and defined a contemporary approach to seduction located between provocation and playing with the concept of beauty.
She has never considered photography to be merely a tool to render reality visible. Rather, she uses it as an instrument to impose her point of view through both intimacy and distance.

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Stories and works:
https://www.agencevu.com/photographers/photographer.php?id=65

http://www.spainisculture.com/en/artistas_creadores/ouka_leele.html

Enrica Sacco

Jesus Is My Homeboy

David LaChapelle is an American commercial photographer, fine-art photographer, music video director, film director, and artist.

He is best known for his photography, which often references art history and sometimes conveys social messages. His photographic style has been described as “hyper-real and slyly subversive” and as “kitsch pop surrealism

LaChapelle created this series of six photographs entitled Jesus Is My Homeboy,  he said that through this series, he wanted to “rescue the teachings of Christ” from the fundamentalists, who use Jesus’ words to judge and condemn rather than uplift.  Unlike a lot of contemporary Jesus art, he said, Jesus Is My Homeboy is not meant to be ironic or shocking, but to convey a beautiful sentiment, and the sincerity of his own faith.91r0T14fGgL 77686f0015f0ab4f346fa8cc0e6ca3d6

COPS-02

COPS-02

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Maryam Marvi