About plastic surgery

Marie-Lou Desmeules is an artist who uses pure pigment to transform living models into bizarre sculptures of surreal celebrity lookalikes. Her work refers in particular to plastic surgery which often for some reason or another, didn’t exactly go as anticipated. We can read in her work a veiled complaint to reality television, which imposed this kind of beauty.

The art of glitches by Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar, is an artist from Canada. She uses images from encyclopedias, biology textbooks, featuring sexy pinups, children, politician-on-TV subject matters, but each gives off an air of american antiquity. Then search the glitch effect she wants by using a scanner; moving the image while that is being scanned, the results are distorted figures. “By mashing up these two technologies, I want to highlight the obsolescence of the old one and the future obsolescence of the new one”. She thinks that the most stylish pictures are the kitchest ones.

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

The beauty of diversity

Michelle Marshall is a french photographer. During her career she decided to document the incidence of the MC1R gene mutation responsible for red hair and freckles, particularly amongst black/mixed raced individuals of all ages. The gene is recessive, which means both parents need to have it, in order for the child to receive it. Marshall wanted to show the stereotype of the redhead is not representative for all people who enjoy their red strands. Her work is really interesting.

Christian Richter shows the beauty in ruins

“When I was young, I fell in love with abandoned buildings. After I got a camera as a present, I started photographing the beauty there. I mostly photograph empty buildings with great staircases or interiors.”

“I simply adore old decaying architecture, their patterns and textures – they remind me that everything is impermanent. Abandoned architecture photography is my ongoing project and I often travel around Europe looking for abandoned buildings.”

[http://www.boredpanda.com/abandoned-buildings-urban-decay-photography-christian-richter/]

The photographer who normalizes women’s imperfect bodies

After a slew of instagram hate following her body positive imagery depicting women’s body hair went viral, it would have been easy for Seattle based photographer Ashley Armitage to take a step back from her bare-all approach to photography. But this online hate didn’t deter her from portraying a realistic, photoshop free depiction of the female form. Instead of bowing to the trolls, Armitage decided to push the boundaries of beauty standards further, shooting stretch marks, scars, spots and more.

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage

“I create images of the female body because historically these images have been controlled by men. We were always the painted and not the painters. I’m trying to take back what’s ours and explore what it means to have a body that has always been defined by a male hand”– Ashley Armitage

[http://www.dazeddigital.com/photography/article/29017/1/the-photographer-normalising-our-imperfect-bodies]

Play- Doh portraits by Jose Cardoso

Jose Cardoso’s work looks scary but surely it is really interesting.

“There’s a lot of theories about identity loss nowadays, about how social networks can help you fake your real identity, why do people use photoshop in order to hide imperfections but never use that tool to enhance deficiencies?”

This work could be refered also to how easy is to get plastic surgery to your face like it was made of Play-Doh.

These photos are open to a variety of interpretations.

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/play-doh-portraits-jose-cardoso_us_5734e23fe4b08f96c18294c4?utm_hp_ref=photography]

Photosculptures by Brno del Zou

Brno del Zou is an artist and a photographer who uses an interesting fragment style which highlights all parts of a human face. In his “photosculptures” series, Brno Del Zou uses the fragmentation of the body in order to better understand it. The body and the faces are revisited and their volumes are highlighted in order to create installations of multiple scales. These “photosculptures” suggest a clear aesthetic preference which does not hide the chaotic side of our minds.

Photo series by Sheila Pree morphs real women with Barbie

We’ve seen what a Barbie doll would look like if modeled after the average 19-year-old woman. But when you juxtapose a doll’s facial features with a real woman’s, the results are startling.

That’s what photographer Sheila Pree Bright did in her 2003 series “Plastic Bodies,” which is currently part of the traveling art show “Posing Beauty in African American Culture.” Pree Bright’s work focuses mostly on women of color, exploring their complex relationships to white beauty standards by combining images of real women’s bodies and faces with those of dolls.

“American concepts of the “perfect female body” are clearly exemplified through commercialism, portraying “image as everything” and introducing trends that many spend hundreds of dollars to imitate. It is more common than ever that women are enlarging breasts with silicone, making short hair longer with synthetic hair weaves, covering natural nails with acrylic fill-ins, or perhaps replacing natural eyes with contacts.

Even on magazine covers, graphic artists are airbrushing and manipulating photographs in software programs, making the image of a small waist and clear skin flawless. As a result, the female body becomes a replica of a doll, and the essence of natural beauty in popular American culture is replaced by fantasy.”

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/22/plastic-bodies-sheila-pree-bright-beauty-identity_n_4324403.html]

Awesome Split Personality Portraits Through Clever Styling

For a recent assignment, Sydney-based photographer Toby Dixon created these two awesome split personality portraits not with fancy Photoshop but with the help of two talented friends. Monique Moynihan, who was in charge of styling and Budi, who handled make-up, transformed a man and a woman each into two distinct halves.

Similar to a mullet, “business in the front, party in the back,” these side by side characters couldn’t be more different. While the studious, bow-tie and pearls-wearing side seems more than a little serious, the tattoo-sporting, red lipstick-wearing party side is all about letting loose.

Dixon proudly states about this project, “No cutting, no comping, no Photoshop trickery.”

[http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/toby-dixon-split-personality-portraits]

Datamoshing : when technology error become art

Datamoshing is the practice of intentionally using compression artifacts in digital video and animated GIFs that is sometimes to referred to as “glitch art.”

source: http://knowyourmeme.com/photos/635048-datamoshing

source: http://knowyourmeme.com/photos/635048-datamoshing

According to the tech blog Bit_Synthesis published a post titled “Datamoshing – the Beauty of Glitch,” the practice of datamoshing had been used by digital artists since at least 2005. In 2006, a technique created by artists Betrand Planes and Christian Jacquemin transcodes one lossy video format into another was demonstrated with the modified DivX video codec DivXPrime.

On August 2nd, 2007, YouTuber Michael Crowe uploaded a video titled “Takeshi Murata,” which featured a montage of datamoshed videos (shown below).

 

On February 24th, 2009, YouTuber datamosher uploaded a datamosh instructional video (shown below). On June 16th, rapper Kanye West released the music video for his song “Welcome to the Heartbreak” (shown below), which featured many datamoshed video artifacts. Within the first four years, the video gathered more than 10.3 million views and 11,400 comments.

On May 16th, 2011, YouTuber Yung Jake uploaded a music video titled “Datamosh,” which included a variety of compression artifacts (shown below). On March 25th, 2012, the /r/brokengifs subreddit was launched, featuring animated GIFs created using datamoshing techniques.

 

(The original source of this article is: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/datamoshing#fn4)

The data is used today to make political and social satire , not to mention the artistic aspect . As the leading exponents of street art . Below some example.

 

source: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/datamoshing/photos

source: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/datamoshing/photos

source: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/datamoshing/photos

source: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/datamoshing/photos

source: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/datamoshing/photos

source: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/datamoshing/photos

1d3

source: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/datamoshing/photos

My Peluche Needs a Transplant

An organization in Japan care broken toys taking the pieces from others. Objective: to teach children what is a transplant. The idea is that a donor organization provides a toy that does not use from which will be explanted organs (ie the pieces) which will then be used to repair another broken toy. The donor will receive in return a letter with photos of the repaired toy and his happy owner and from there will start a discussion with friends and family about the importance of organ donation.

1463130330_Second-Life-Toys--1200x710 1463130340_Second-Life-Toys-1200x710

Eleonora Formiconi

The Art Of The Internet

By the term net art, which is also referred with Internet art, it refers to a contemporary artistic discipline aimed at creating works of art with, for and in the Internet. This art form has bypassed the traditional domain of the Museums and Galleries circuit, leaving the main role of the experience of aesthetic enjoyment to the Internet or other electronic networks. In many cases, viewing the work it is disintegrated in a particular kind of interaction with the artistic work. Artists working in this way are often called net artist. A well-known theorist Lev Manovich, net art, says it is “the materialization of social networks on the internet communications.” In fact the precursor group of this artistic movement has been able to create an artistic genre especially through its ability to create networks and connect programmers worldwide around a creative practice but also ironic. Net.art fact has played a lot with the parody, with error and with the disintegration of the web pages.

artinfo_wrongbiennial1 Frame-no.-0924-prints-on-alu-dibond-68x121cm-2011_2013-copyright-haleh-gallery-2014-1024x566

deFacebook

http://thefreeagencybalt.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/nandan_ghiya_5_20121004_1566092420.jpg

“The work deFacebook by Indian artist Nandan Ghiya consists of a series of portraits made from images taken from popular social networks and physically printed on canvas. The selected photos are classic half-length or full-figured portraits, (partially) set up according to the classical canons of the family portrait. The wooden or golden frames are thick and heavy. Together with the hue of the pictures, which often changes to sepia, they give the images a nostalgic antique mood. This aesthetic vintage effect is functional, engendering a sense of disruptive irony. Some parts of the pictures (often the faces) have been modified using very apparent and colourful glitch effects. This is underlined by a subtle but crucial characteristic: the frames of the paintings retain their classical rigor in the colours and materials but they follow every whim of the glitched pixels which overflow the profiles, breaking the hardness and regularity of the classical frames. With this refined aesthetic expedient, the artist looks to disrupt the style of the classic portrait. The transition to digital of the public representation of the self (once the family portrait) became engrained after Facebook. The subjectivity, so fixed on canvas, is represented in all its fragility, creating effective effigies of the modern portrait – even more impressive because of the errors in the unstructured faces.”

Source: http://neural.it/2013/03/defacebook-glitched-portraits/

Art, Technology, Imperfection: Rosa Menkman and Aesthetics

“Glitches are the uncanny, brutal structures that come to the surface during a break of the flow within a technology; they are the primal data-screams of the machine. In the digital these utterances often take form following the “vernacular of file formats” (the encoded organizations of data). A file format signifies what protocols (formal descriptions and semantic rules) are used to structure or encode the information. Many different file formats exist, for different forms of information and every one of these formats possesses its own encoding structures, which can be understood as a grammar or idiom. When this idiom is broken, for instance by a glitch or a wrong encoding, the data in its basic/primal structures of encoding comes to the surface. Visually glitches show themselves through organizational structures like rasters, grids, blocks, points, interlacing vectors and frames and therefore often look complex, repetitive, discolored, fragmented and flickering”.

Source: http://dinca.org/interview-with-rosa-menkman-dutch-visualist/5323.htm

See also: Rosa Menkman

YouGlitch, deliberate video failures

“YouGlitch is a website created by Martial Geoffre-Rouland and Benjamin Gaulon, based on Corrupt, their web-based Glitch Art Software. Corrupt, built back in 2004 with Proce55ing, enables the corruption of image files through repetitive replacements that can lead to numerous corrupted versions. The process is simple and clear: after users download and install the software, they can use it with webcam videos or ones they have stored on their hard disk. A 10-second video and an animated GIF is saved locally and also automatically uploaded to the new website. YouGlitch is a user-generated collection of glitch creativity. It is based on re-using, recycling, creatively destroying and sharing. It is a collective glitch art project but on its own terms and in accordance with our social media reality. At first sight, YouGlitch doesn’t seem to present accidents or failures as part of a flow or circulation of images. It looks more like a tool for helping users demystify glitch art, opening it up to popularization. It appears as a user-generated aesthetization of interruption that proves (as Rosa Menkman wrote in her Glitch Studies Manifesto) that what is now a glitch is destined to become a fashion. But to my eyes, YouGlitch succeeds on deeper levels: it connects to the present while referring to the past. It correlates the digital with the analogue era by correlating YouTube channels with the TV. It raises questions regarding potentially deliberate failures in the stream of videos and the exercise of control. Could it be that YouGlitch allows for collective play with corruption while at the same time suggesting a form of sabotage? If glitch art can also constitute a form of subversion, couldn’t this project possibly also be about the formation of an anti-apparatus that is unreadable, profane, glitched, out of control?”

Source: http://www.neural.it
See also this: http://beautifullyimperfects.net/2012/02/20/youglitch/

Wabi Sabi: Idea of Beauty

Nothing lasts forever,nothing is finished,nothing is perfect. Japanese Wabi Sabi aesthetics is an idea of beauty whose feature is acceptance of transience and imperfection. In its view change becomes criterion of beauty: the life of the flower and its three stages are expression of an authenticity whose beauty deviates from western traditional and predominant search for perfection, persistence, identity.Wabi Sabi is so realistic and essential view and still looks to the eyes of Westerns so revolutionary!

wabi-sabiwabisabiSource: http://www.teresacarnuccio.it/blog/impermanenza.html;

See also:http://beautifullyimperfects.net/2012/11/28/wabi-sabi-art/

Software art with practical usage

“Artists have always been fascinated by imperfection. A little failure, a small mistake, an unexpected behaviour can be perceived as more meaningful and intriguing than the perfect artwork. This is even more relevant in the computer world where pushing the breaking point of technology is common practice, as shown by a renewed interest in glitch aesthetics over the past few years. A recent example of an art project intrigued by software malfunctions is Extrafile by Kim Asendorf. It consists of a native Mac OS X image converter application with the ability to open, preview and save the most common image file formats in seven different new formats: 4Bit Components, Block Ascii, Block Indexed, Channel Compressed Image, Monochrome Collector File, Uniform Spectrum and the ExtraFile Format, each one with its own properties. With this new set of formats, the aim is to “wiggle the static system of image file formats” and give the artist complete control over their digital artwork. Formalising the visual aspect of glitches in new fictitious ways outside the commercial formats allows the artist to exercise control and to not be at the mercy of the computer. It also provides exclusivity for the artists, so they’re not just using the same old formats as everyone else. As Asendorf puts it “ExtraFile is a pioneer art project in storing image data. The process and the resulting bytes, regardless of content, become the artwork itself”. Being a software art project, Extrafile’s potential as a process is increased by its open source nature. The source code is indeed available on GitHub under the Artistic License 2.0, making this piece conceptual software art with practical usage – quite a rare quality in the online art scene”.
by Valentina Culatti

Source: Neural.it