deFacebook

http://thefreeagencybalt.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/nandan_ghiya_5_20121004_1566092420.jpg

“The work deFacebook by Indian artist Nandan Ghiya consists of a series of portraits made from images taken from popular social networks and physically printed on canvas. The selected photos are classic half-length or full-figured portraits, (partially) set up according to the classical canons of the family portrait. The wooden or golden frames are thick and heavy. Together with the hue of the pictures, which often changes to sepia, they give the images a nostalgic antique mood. This aesthetic vintage effect is functional, engendering a sense of disruptive irony. Some parts of the pictures (often the faces) have been modified using very apparent and colourful glitch effects. This is underlined by a subtle but crucial characteristic: the frames of the paintings retain their classical rigor in the colours and materials but they follow every whim of the glitched pixels which overflow the profiles, breaking the hardness and regularity of the classical frames. With this refined aesthetic expedient, the artist looks to disrupt the style of the classic portrait. The transition to digital of the public representation of the self (once the family portrait) became engrained after Facebook. The subjectivity, so fixed on canvas, is represented in all its fragility, creating effective effigies of the modern portrait – even more impressive because of the errors in the unstructured faces.”

Source: http://neural.it/2013/03/defacebook-glitched-portraits/

Art, Technology, Imperfection: Rosa Menkman and Aesthetics

“Glitches are the uncanny, brutal structures that come to the surface during a break of the flow within a technology; they are the primal data-screams of the machine. In the digital these utterances often take form following the “vernacular of file formats” (the encoded organizations of data). A file format signifies what protocols (formal descriptions and semantic rules) are used to structure or encode the information. Many different file formats exist, for different forms of information and every one of these formats possesses its own encoding structures, which can be understood as a grammar or idiom. When this idiom is broken, for instance by a glitch or a wrong encoding, the data in its basic/primal structures of encoding comes to the surface. Visually glitches show themselves through organizational structures like rasters, grids, blocks, points, interlacing vectors and frames and therefore often look complex, repetitive, discolored, fragmented and flickering”.

Source: http://dinca.org/interview-with-rosa-menkman-dutch-visualist/5323.htm

See also: Rosa Menkman

YouGlitch, deliberate video failures

“YouGlitch is a website created by Martial Geoffre-Rouland and Benjamin Gaulon, based on Corrupt, their web-based Glitch Art Software. Corrupt, built back in 2004 with Proce55ing, enables the corruption of image files through repetitive replacements that can lead to numerous corrupted versions. The process is simple and clear: after users download and install the software, they can use it with webcam videos or ones they have stored on their hard disk. A 10-second video and an animated GIF is saved locally and also automatically uploaded to the new website. YouGlitch is a user-generated collection of glitch creativity. It is based on re-using, recycling, creatively destroying and sharing. It is a collective glitch art project but on its own terms and in accordance with our social media reality. At first sight, YouGlitch doesn’t seem to present accidents or failures as part of a flow or circulation of images. It looks more like a tool for helping users demystify glitch art, opening it up to popularization. It appears as a user-generated aesthetization of interruption that proves (as Rosa Menkman wrote in her Glitch Studies Manifesto) that what is now a glitch is destined to become a fashion. But to my eyes, YouGlitch succeeds on deeper levels: it connects to the present while referring to the past. It correlates the digital with the analogue era by correlating YouTube channels with the TV. It raises questions regarding potentially deliberate failures in the stream of videos and the exercise of control. Could it be that YouGlitch allows for collective play with corruption while at the same time suggesting a form of sabotage? If glitch art can also constitute a form of subversion, couldn’t this project possibly also be about the formation of an anti-apparatus that is unreadable, profane, glitched, out of control?”

Source: http://www.neural.it
See also this: http://beautifullyimperfects.net/2012/02/20/youglitch/

Wabi Sabi: Idea of Beauty

Nothing lasts forever,nothing is finished,nothing is perfect. Japanese Wabi Sabi aesthetics is an idea of beauty whose feature is acceptance of transience and imperfection. In its view change becomes criterion of beauty: the life of the flower and its three stages are expression of an authenticity whose beauty deviates from western traditional and predominant search for perfection, persistence, identity.Wabi Sabi is so realistic and essential view and still looks to the eyes of Westerns so revolutionary!

wabi-sabiwabisabiSource: http://www.teresacarnuccio.it/blog/impermanenza.html;

See also:http://beautifullyimperfects.net/2012/11/28/wabi-sabi-art/

The Million Dollar Homepage //

The Million Dollar Homepage

The Million Dollar Homepage is a website conceived in 2005 by Alex Tew, a student from Wiltshire, England, to raise money for his university education. The home page consists of a million pixels arranged in a 1000 × 1000 pixel grid; the image-based links on it were sold for US$1 per pixel in 10 × 10 blocks. The purchasers of these pixel blocks provided tiny images to be displayed on them, a URL to which the images were linked, and a slogan to be displayed when hovering a cursor over the link.
Launched on 26 August 2005, the website became an Internet phenomenon. The Alexa ranking of web traffic peaked at around 127; as of 18 December 2009, it is 35,983. On 1 January 2006, the final 1,000 pixels were put up for auction on eBay. The auction closed on 11 January with a winning bid of $38,100 that brought the final tally to $1,037,100 in gross income. His website was also featured in the book “Cool Tech Gadgets, Games, Robots, and the Digital World”.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Million_Dollar_Homepage)

Software art with practical usage

“Artists have always been fascinated by imperfection. A little failure, a small mistake, an unexpected behaviour can be perceived as more meaningful and intriguing than the perfect artwork. This is even more relevant in the computer world where pushing the breaking point of technology is common practice, as shown by a renewed interest in glitch aesthetics over the past few years. A recent example of an art project intrigued by software malfunctions is Extrafile by Kim Asendorf. It consists of a native Mac OS X image converter application with the ability to open, preview and save the most common image file formats in seven different new formats: 4Bit Components, Block Ascii, Block Indexed, Channel Compressed Image, Monochrome Collector File, Uniform Spectrum and the ExtraFile Format, each one with its own properties. With this new set of formats, the aim is to “wiggle the static system of image file formats” and give the artist complete control over their digital artwork. Formalising the visual aspect of glitches in new fictitious ways outside the commercial formats allows the artist to exercise control and to not be at the mercy of the computer. It also provides exclusivity for the artists, so they’re not just using the same old formats as everyone else. As Asendorf puts it “ExtraFile is a pioneer art project in storing image data. The process and the resulting bytes, regardless of content, become the artwork itself”. Being a software art project, Extrafile’s potential as a process is increased by its open source nature. The source code is indeed available on GitHub under the Artistic License 2.0, making this piece conceptual software art with practical usage – quite a rare quality in the online art scene”.
by Valentina Culatti

Source: Neural.it

Flexible Pixels by Benjamin Grosser

“The pixel is the fundamental unit of digital imaging, a square representation of a single color. Pixels are always the same size, and always arranged in orderly grids. This project looks at what happens when you change these universally agreed upon standards. More broadly, I’m interested in how the construction of digital images alters our perceptions of reality. Does computer-mediated vision change how we see without computers?”


Self Portrait 1x4x9 (2009), oil on canvas, 28″x30″


Self Portrait (2009), computationally-produced digital image using software written by the artist

Source: http://bengrosser.com/projects/flexible-pixels/

AN INTERNATIONAL NOISE && [DIRTY] NEW-MEDIA FESTIVAL

GLI.TC/H 20111
AN INTERNATIONAL NOISE && [DIRTY] NEW-MEDIA
EVENT/CONFERENCE/FESTIVAL/GATHERING

Now in its second year, GLI.TC/H gathers a variety of participants + works + ideas from within glitch/dirty/experimental-new-media art communities into a multi-day & multi-format happening consisting of video screenings, real-time performances, workshops, lectures, panels, a gallery exhibition and on-going online components.

Thinkers and artists; Makers and breakers converge to celebrate technological catastrophe. A glitch is a moment known to everyone but enjoyed by few. GLI.TC/H brings together those inspired/curious/provoked by glitches and provides a platform to break things, share thoughts, and develop ideas.

GLI.TC/H will include works from over 100 participants from more than a dozen countries and will be taking place in virtual-space at http://gli.tc/h and in real-space from Nov 3 – 6 in Chicago, US; Nov 11 – 13 in Amsterdam, NL; Nov 19 in Birmingham, UK.

When imperfection comes out from software malfunctions

“A glitch is a mess that is a moment, a possibility to glance at software’s inner structure, wheter it is a mechanism of data compression or HTML code. Altough a glitch does not revel the true functionality of the computer, it shows the ghostly conventionality of the forms by which digital spaces are organized.”
Olga Goriunova and Alexei Shulgin, Glitch, in Matthew Fuller (edited by), Software Studies: A Lexicon, Cambridge, MA: Mit Press, 2008, p. 114.

http://mitpress.mit.edu/images/products/books/9780262062749-f30.jpg

The following are clear examples of what the aesthetics of glitch can be:
http://infiniteglitch.com/
http://oculasm.org/glitch/
http://dmtr.org/glitchbrowser/

Glitch: Designing Imperfection

“Systems Fail. Errors Happen, Computers don’t know whats going on. We see interesting and unusual visuals artefacts and glitches, We capture them!
At other times we provoke them!
This book presents a really colorful and vibrant variety of unusual visual glitch artwork from some very talented people.
This book was 4 years in the making, and received over 900 contributions! The book is a must have for anyone with an interest in Glitch Art & Aesthetics. With interviews and introductions for those who want to learn more.”

Source: designingimperfection.com

Unpixelated

“The concept behind Unpixelated (2009) by the Swedish artist Anders Weberg is the fact that Japanese law requires that all male and female genitalia in Japanese porn be blurred, so as to obscure it from sight, a procedure referred to as bokashi. In Unpixelated, Weberg utilizes software that reconstructs the censored images. Once the software has been applied, the rest of the image is blurred, so that only the previously censored genitalia are clearly identifiable.”

Web Aesthetics, p. 164.

http://www.unpixelated.org/

Unpixelated:One by Anders Weberg from Anders Weberg on Vimeo.

Delter

“In Delter (2002), Victor Liu offers an explicit magnification of the approximate nature of the digital moving image. Using software capable of extracting what is between one frame and another in an MPEG video, Liu reveals the inter-frames as shaded, ghost-like traces of a video’s images. With this project, Liu exposes the structure of the data as fixed in a compression procedure, revealing a scheme designed to be viewed and interpreted by machines only. In viewing this structure, we see the human becoming machine: the last landing place of the desire to replace the machine in rebuilding the wholeness of the movement of the images that Delter deprives of their objects.”

Web Aesthetics, p. 164.

http://www.n-gon.com/delter/

http://www.ikatun.com/info@blah/printimages/infoblah_victorliu_delter-cap-c.jpg

Low Resolution Cinema

“Julien Marie’s Low Resolution Cinema (2005)31 is an abstract vision of the geopolitical space of the city of Berlin. Through a series of expedients, among which is the drastic lowering of the resolution, Marie aims at decompressing the image in a 3-D space. A special projector realized by two semi-broken black-and-white Liquid Crystal Displays is used to show only the upper or the lower part of the image, which is constantly moving closer and further from the projector lamp, which itself also moves back and forth. The resulting image is so damaged that it evokes the scrolling matrix code seen in The Matrix, or the tight characters produced on the scroll of a dot matrix printer. In Low Resolution Cinema the perfection of the image becomes a shaded memory, but the magic of cinema, that illusion produced by moving images, remains absolutely intact.”
Web Aesthetics, p. 163.

http://julienmaire.ideenshop.net/project5.shtml

http://julienmaire.ideenshop.net/images/low_proj1L.jpg