Cracked Log Lamps

Artist Duncan Meerding has crafted a beautiful line of lamps that can be used as stools or tables from salvaged logs that were considered to be imperfect because of the deep cracks and crevices within the wood and destined to be burned. Instead, Meerding used the imperfections to allow the light to playfully peek through, beautifully lighting the way indoors or out.
The Cracked Log Lamps are made from salvaged logs which would otherwise have been burnt. These lamps embrace, rather than avoid the naturally occurring cracks in refuse logs. By turning them into a vessel for light, we can bring the outside in, and be reminded of our intrinsic connection with nature. The warm yellow light coming through each lamps unique light pattern highlights the fiery fate that the salvaged timber would have otherwise been exposed to. These lamps embrace the cracks often avoided in timber based designs – pushing the light through the things often associated with darkness. Before turning on the Cracked Log Lamp, often a person would think it is purely just a log of wood.

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Chiara Barbera

‘We’ve Never Seen Anything Like This Before’

 

The World Heritage-listed reef is currently suffering its worst bleaching in recorded history with 93 percent of corals affected due to warming sea temperatures.

 

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 Barriera corallina in Belize – © WWF Canon

 “We’ve never seen anything like this scale of bleaching before,” – said Professor Terry Hughes, who convened a team of 300 scientists to study the bleaching. – “In the northern Great Barrier Reef, it’s like ten cyclones have come ashore all at once.” Following aerial surveys of 911 reefs, the scientists found that only 68 were completely intact and that almost a third were severely or entirely bleached. (from: The Telegraph )

 

close-up look at the Great Barrier Reef’s bleaching

( the whole article and photos: The Conversation )

April 12, 2016 9.12pm BST
Justin Marshall/coralwatch.org, Author provided
University of Queensland, Australia

Pictures show the silent death of many of these beautiful organisms. But, as noted above, the bleaching can in some cases be weirdly beautiful, as the corals shed their algal cloaks and reveal themselves

 

Giada Semeraro

After Bleaching,
sea-life on the reef. See more on
The Conversation