My Peluche Needs a Transplant

An organization in Japan care broken toys taking the pieces from others. Objective: to teach children what is a transplant. The idea is that a donor organization provides a toy that does not use from which will be explanted organs (ie the pieces) which will then be used to repair another broken toy. The donor will receive in return a letter with photos of the repaired toy and his happy owner and from there will start a discussion with friends and family about the importance of organ donation.

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Eleonora Formiconi

When The Boxer Is a Painter

Omar Hassan is 29 years old, Italian mother Egyptian father. There’s color everywhere, from the sketches on his shoes and laptop because Omar is a painter. Omar boxa with the canvas. Dips his gloves in painting and tum-tum-tum, you hear the sound of fists on the canvas, an artistic gesture summarizing street art.

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Eleonora Formiconi

Dispatchwork

Jan Vormann is a German artist became famous thanks to a truly original idea: to fill the cracks of old walls, buildings and dilapidated structures with Lego bricks. The experiment, despite his art studies in Berlin, began during a visit to Rome by that time, thanks to his travels that have taken him around the world, has managed to put his signature everywhere. the aim is, through a satirical criticism, counter excessive seriousness of the citizens groups and to make them more cheerful and livable spaces.

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Eleonora Formiconi

Edward Honaker documents his own depression

Twenty one-year-old photographer Edward Honaker documents his own depression in powerful self-portraits. The series of black and white images illustrates the photographer’s experience with depression and anxiety.

In an attempt to raise awareness of the topic, Honaker says about the project:

Mental health disorders are such a taboo topic.

If you ever bring it up in conversation, people awkwardly get silent, or try to tell you why it’s not a real problem.

When I was in the worst parts of depression, the most helpful thing anyone could have done was to just listen to me – not judging, not trying to find a solution, just listen.

I’m hoping that these images will help open up conversation about mental health issues.

Everyone is or will be affected by them one way or another, and ignoring them doesn’t make things better. 

It’s kind of hard to feel any kind of emotion when you’re depressed, and I think good art can definitely move people”

Edward’s face is blurred or covered in all of the haunting black and white photos, which are meant to portray the helplessness felt by someone who is battling a depressive disorder. 

“All I knew is that I became bad at the things I used to be good at, and I didn’t know why” Edward recalled of the time before his diagnosis. Your mind is who you are, and when it doesn’t work properly, it’s scary” he noted. 

The Honaker’s series of mental illness portraits are a powerful reminder that while each individual’s experience with depression is personal, the feelings can be universal.

http://www.edwardhonaker.com/booktwo/

http://edwardandrew.tumblr.com/About

#DefineBeauty series by Nowness

Founded in 2010, Nowness is a video channel premiering the best in global arts and culture.

The channel’s programming strategy has established it as the go to source of inspiration and influence across art, design, fashion, beauty, music, food, and travel. They work with both established and emerging filmmakers which connect their audience to emotional and sensorial stories designed to provoke inspiration and debate.

The #DefineBeauty Series collects videos created for “unpicking the politics and prejudices of attraction”. 

#1 – Define Beauty: Les Fleurs by Saam Farahmand

Director Saam Farahmand heats up the body hair debate.

“One of the things I appreciate most about female beauty is what’s commonly appreciated the least” says Saam Farahmand of his ode to body hair that launches NOWNESS’ new five-part series #DefineBeauty. “I wanted to find something about women that was almost unanimously disliked.” The transformation of the female form from hairless ideal to glorious natural state is set to the rousing score of Minnie Riperton’s “Les Fleurs”.

“There was something so affecting about Minnie Riperton’s ability to breathe her gender—she speaks to female sexuality in a way that seems to exclude male consideration” says the London-based filmmaker.

 

#2 – Define Beauty: My Scars by Matthew Donaldson

Each disrupted surface has a story to tell: a heavily scarred man and his lover share their intimate thoughts in Matthew Donaldson’s “My Scars”.

Matthew Donaldson illuminates the narrative function of scars in this stripped-back portrait of British photographer Sam Barker, accompanied by intimate reflections from his lover.

 

#3 – Define Beauty: Beyond the Skin by Jonas Åkerlund

Director Jonas Åkerlund takes model Shaun Ross on a hyperkinetic trip through LA.

“Hollywood is so good at only seeing what’s on the outside, and using that first impression instead of going deeper” says Jonas Åkerlund of the location of the final film in the #DefineBeauty series, in which he follows American model and actor Shaun Ross around the back streets and freeways of Los Angeles. “I think Shaun has spent all his life with those reactions. Look again and you see that this guy is really beautiful.

His gothic style is apparent in today’s portrait of the famed albino model, who recently starred in Lana Del Rey’s 30 minute film, Tropico. “When Shaun showed up on Hollywood Boulevard, Darth Vader and Mickey Mouse were affronted” the filmmaker says of filming Ross. “Like, ‘What the fuck is this guy doing here?”.

 

https://www.nowness.com/tag/define-beauty

Cracked Log Lamps

Artist Duncan Meerding has crafted a beautiful line of lamps that can be used as stools or tables from salvaged logs that were considered to be imperfect because of the deep cracks and crevices within the wood and destined to be burned. Instead, Meerding used the imperfections to allow the light to playfully peek through, beautifully lighting the way indoors or out.
The Cracked Log Lamps are made from salvaged logs which would otherwise have been burnt. These lamps embrace, rather than avoid the naturally occurring cracks in refuse logs. By turning them into a vessel for light, we can bring the outside in, and be reminded of our intrinsic connection with nature. The warm yellow light coming through each lamps unique light pattern highlights the fiery fate that the salvaged timber would have otherwise been exposed to. These lamps embrace the cracks often avoided in timber based designs – pushing the light through the things often associated with darkness. Before turning on the Cracked Log Lamp, often a person would think it is purely just a log of wood.

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Chiara Barbera

Reflections ‘Narcissuses and other flowers’. Mirrors.

Designer Eglė Stonkutė | Photography by Martyna Jovaišaitė

001Looking at the mirror too much used to be a sin in the middle ages. A lot of ‘Narcissuses and other flowers’ blossomed in nowadays society though. They record their looks using smart technology and admire their appearances. Deformations seen in the mirrors are inspired by the constantly moving surface of the water, which is determined by exterior powers like sound waves and nature’s elements like wind. Reflections’ deformations attract the attention to inside beauty and listening to oneself.

002The first mirror is an interpretation of circular waves of water in plastic.

The next- an extract from the legend of Narcissus was an inspiration for crooked bottom form (elongated reflections on the crooked surface): ‘…how many times he put his hands into the water trying to take his sister out of the river that many times he failed…’

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Concave moving mirror turning the view upside-down is an allusion to a view seen through a drop of water.
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The reflection of the mirror gets bigger at a certain distance of an object getting closer.

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The third mirror- composition of crooked mirror stripes is inspired by the constant moving of the water which totally deforms the reflection. Moreover, it makes a distance between you and your ‘real reflection’ and stimulates good emotions for a viewer, who share those emotions meanwhile they forget a ‘perfect’ or ‘imperfect’ appearance.

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Pleasant emotions and unexpected perspectives of a reflection in all the mirrors move away people from outside world of reflections and let dive into things that the most matter – feelings and self-analysis.

The Art Of The Internet

By the term net art, which is also referred with Internet art, it refers to a contemporary artistic discipline aimed at creating works of art with, for and in the Internet. This art form has bypassed the traditional domain of the Museums and Galleries circuit, leaving the main role of the experience of aesthetic enjoyment to the Internet or other electronic networks. In many cases, viewing the work it is disintegrated in a particular kind of interaction with the artistic work. Artists working in this way are often called net artist. A well-known theorist Lev Manovich, net art, says it is “the materialization of social networks on the internet communications.” In fact the precursor group of this artistic movement has been able to create an artistic genre especially through its ability to create networks and connect programmers worldwide around a creative practice but also ironic. Net.art fact has played a lot with the parody, with error and with the disintegration of the web pages.

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Miroslav Tichy

Miroslav Tichý , born 20 November 1926 in Kyjov he studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague . During the communist regime it was considered a dissident, after escaping from the police cecosl. Tichý realized in secret from 1960 to 1985 thousands of photos of women in his hometown of Kyjov, Czech Republic, with cameras built by hand with cardboard tubes, cans. aware of being photographed. Your photos in soft-focus and fleeting glimpses of women Kyjov are oblique , stained and poorly printed ; vitiated by the limits of its primitive equipment and a series of errors in the process of develo.

 

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LINK: http://marcocrupifoto.blogspot.it/2012/10/miroslav-tichy-artista-fotografo-e.html?m=0

 

CAROLINA MONACO

Dog Palla

Palla was saved by volunteers and taken to the clinic, a nylon strap at the neck that nearly decapitated and perhaps wore since she was a puppy. This prevented the blood to flow properly, bringing the head to swell dramatically. But it is fine now, even if his head is not completely deflated, is beautiful all the same.

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LINK: http://trovalazampa.corriere.it/rubrica/attualita/palla-storia-di-un-cane-salvato-dalla-cattiveria-umana

CAROLINA MONACO

I’m No Angel by Lane Bryant

The Lane Bryant #IMNOANGEL initiative celebrates women of all shapes and sizes by redefining society’s traditional notion of sexy with a powerful core message: ALL women are sexy,” the brand says.

It’s a direct dig at Victoria’s Secret, and social media is loving it.  Women have jumped on the trending hashtag, posting their own photos and declarations with #ImNoAngel.

Ashley Graham, one of the stars of the Lane Bryant campaign (she was also in that Swimsuits for All ad in the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue), posted a fun photo  to Instagram yesterday, writing: “On the F train, literally. Can’t hide these curves!!!”.

Source: http://www.adweek.com/adfreak/lane-bryant-bashes-victorias-secret-im-no-angel-campaign-163944

Some curvy modelsA curvy modelModel

Cindy Sherman: the masquerade of identity

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Untitled Film Still #15. 1978

Gelatin silver print, 9 7/16 x 7 1/2″ (24 x 19.1 cm).The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Barbara and Eugene Schwartz in honor of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder.© 2012 Cindy Sherman

 

The American feminist artist Cindy Sherman (1954)  “emerged onto the New York art scene in the early 1980s as part of a new generatio
n of artists concerned with the codes of representation in a media-saturated era” .
She posed in different stereotypical female roles, she’s got plenty of subjective emotions she can exploit through the media: In photograph after photograph, Sherman was ever present with different costumes. She wants to overturn the trend of the american society based on appearence and consumption,ready to celebrate the product and not its producer.

“Throughout her career, Sherman has appropriated numerous visual genres—including the film still, centerfold, fashion photograph, historical portrait, and soft-core sex image—while disrupting the operations that work to define and maintain their respective codes of representation.[…]

Cindy Sherman’s Untitled Film Stills (1977–80) have been canonized as a hallmark of postmodernist art, which frequently utilized mass-media codes and techniques of representation in order to comment on contemporary society.[…]  Sherman’s stills have an artifice that is heightened by the often visible camera cord, slightly eccentric props, unusual camera angles, and by the fact that each image includes the artist, rather than a recognizable actress or model.”

From: http://www.guggenheim.org/


Portraits
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Untitled #359. 2000

Chromogenic color print, 30 x 20″ (76.2 x 50.8 cm). Courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. © 2012 Cindy Sherman

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Untitled #360. 2000

Chromogenic color print, 30 x 20″ (76.2 x 50.8 cm). Stefan T. Edlis Collection.
© 2012 Cindy Sherman
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Untitled #408. 2002

Chromogenic color print, 54 x 36″ (137.2 x 91.4 cm). Collection of Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond J. Learsy. © 2012 Cindy Sherman

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Untitled #132. 1984

Chromogenic color print, 67 x 47″ (170.2 x 199.4 cm). Collection of John Cheim.
© 2012 Cindy Sherman

With bright light and high-contrast color, Sherman focuses on the consequences of society’s stereotyped roles for women — in this case as a victim of fashion — rather than upon the roles themselves.

Giada Semeraro

The Power Of Imperfection

The Renaissance man puts himself at the center of the world and loves to be represented in all his fair power, not separated by a certain hardness.Piero della Francesca painted in the face of Federico da Montefeltro the expression of a man who knows exactly what he wants. The shapes of body do not hide the strength, nor the effects of pleasure: the man of power, fat and dumpy when is not muscular, flaunts the signs of the power he exercises. While the aesthetic theory engages with the rules of proportion and symmetry of the body, the powerful men of the time are living a violation of these laws: the male figure also lends itself to enhance the freedom of the artist of the classical canons.
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Source: Cinemavvenire.it

The imperfection’s nonsense.

”Donna Moderna”,an italian magazine published an article about the imperfection. In this article imperfection is defined as the beauty nonsense. In this article the theme of imperfection is close to fashion trends. As far as hair,if in one hand there is the trend to be precise,on the other hand,there is the trend to be uncombed. As far as make-up trends, on one hand there is the trends to be very pefect and precise,on the other hand,lof of women prefer to be shade.
So in this article there is a question:Where is imperfection? What is imperfection?.
In this article the fashion model Daphne Groeneveld is considered the imperfection’s example.

 

http://www.donnamoderna.com/bellezza/viso-e-corpo/trend-2012-trucco-capelli/foto-11