Under the Red Dress Project

Beth Whaang

Beth Whaanga’s series of photos called Under the Red Dress show the changes to her body caused by cancer. Photograph: Nadia Masot.

“How radical and provocative is an honest image of a woman’s body?
Beth Whaanga, a mother of four from Brisbane, Australia, is finding out after posting images on Facebook of her body following surgery for breast cancer late last year. Taken by Nadia Masot, the pictures are brilliantly direct, documenting Whaanga’s ongoing hair loss, total bilateral mastectomy, navel reconstruction and hysterectomy scar. Whaanga lost more than 100 friends on Facebook after posting the pictures – and then they went viral. A registered nurse, she describes herself as a “breast cancer preventer”, and hopes to make people more aware of the physical changes that might signal a problem.”

Source: The Guardian

Beth Whaanga2

See also: The Scar Project

“Regular Women” campaign

According to Chrystal Bougon, owner of plus-size lingerie store Curvy Girl, “There are so many pictures of models in lingerie, but I’m constantly asked for pictures of our products on ‘regular’ bodies… In the fashion world, anything over size 4 is considered plus-size. I know, it’s a big joke.”

Bougon stated: “Inspired by a customer, I wanted to show that women with rolls, bumps, lumps, scars, stretch marks, surgery scars and natural breasts that have nursed babies can be stunning and beautiful.” And women have responded in full-force, posting their own photos to Curvy Girl’s Facebook page in high numbers.


curvy girl lingerie

curvy girls

Source: Huffington Post

A Beautiful Body Project

“I began this book project unknowingly: After shooting some self-portraits with my 5-week-old son Sequoia accompanied by a blog about my newly-round post-Birth body, I was flooded with emails by mothers wanting to share their Incredible, Inspiring, & Sometimes Painful stories with me. It was then I realized I had to tell their untold stories, that a body of work begged to be created! Through Photographs & personal essays from these courageous mothers all over the country, I hope to offer a powerful healing tool for Mothers everywhere. Since inception, 1000’s of women have volunteered & the project ‘A Beautiful Body Project’ was born. Together we can redefine our culture’s idea of a beautiful woman. I have photographed and humbly listened to hundreds of stories now: Anorexia; childhood bulimia; a woman being told by her mother she was too fat to be a ballerina. Self-hatred; self-inflicted-suffering; Feeling unsexy because she perceived her nipples as imperfect; feeling unsexy because she lost too much weight after breast feeding; Feeling like there was something deeply wrong with her because she had only lost 5 pounds 9 months after the birth of her 2nd child; Sexual abuse; teenage & young adult drug addictions due to self loathing because she never felt beautiful; breast cancer after the birth of a long-awaited pregnancy; loss of a baby at birth with a wrinkly tummy & un-suckled breasts to remind her everyday of what might have been”.

Mother and Child

“There are so many stories shadowing mothers in our culture. We are, however, also tremendously blessed with vast amounts of freedom as American Women: we are lucky to be able to shape-shift concepts and ideas in our country. We have the ability to choose to feel worthy, to believe we are beautiful and to act as women who wish to share beauty and joy in this world as an inter-connected community of people seeking a beautiful and peaceful life. It is my hope in 2013 to find a publisher for this book of powerful photographs & stories in order to inspire thousands of other mothers who are eager to feel validated by witnessing this exploration of vulnerability as a collective”.

Source: http://jadebeall.com/a-beautiful-body-project/

Large Labia Project

“I have medium-large labia. I have meaty outer lips, & long thick inner lips. And my inner labia are different sizes. I love my labia. But some women don’t love theirs. Many women see unrealistic images and listen to misguided opinions and think their labia should be neat, small & invisible to be “normal”. This blog is all about fighting that view, by showing how perfectly normal and beautiful large labia are. Really they’re nothing special though, the average woman has them! Anyway I’ll show you mine & feel free to submit yours”.
Large Labia Project

Source: http://largelabiaproject.org/

Our Breasts

Our Breasts “celebrates the beautiful diversity of natural breasts, of all sizes, shapes, colours, ages and races. Breasts are such an important and integral part of what makes us feel feminine, sexual, and real women. By showing how all women are different, and uniquely special, as a gender we will be able to challenge the beliefs around what makes breasts beautiful. And in turn, we will be able to help women feel better about themselves. Help show the beauty of all women by contributing your breasts to this project”.Hi Emma, I’ve previously submitted to your large labia project tumblr, yet somehow I am finding submitting my breasts a hundred times more nerve-wracking. I guess boobs are so much more “out there”, whereas a vulva is still relatively rare outside porn! And everybody loves to have an opinion on boobs… I’m 39, and a 34A-B ish, depending on the time of the month. I’ve breast-fed two children. I used to hate being small, although I eventually came to realise that there are some advantages, specifically around clothing. After all, it is easier to add padding than it is to reduce breasts! However, while I’ve come to accept their size, on rare bad days I can still feel self-conscious about their shape - I’d love them to be a bit rounder and less tubular.  So thank you for this site, where I can remind myself on such days that we don’t all look like porn stars, and that actually that’s pretty cool.  x______________ Thanks for sharing your pretty breasts and being so brave. You’re wonderful, and really gorgeous. Honestly, I love your yummy mummy boobs. Be proud of them!!! :) Emmaxo

Source: http://ourbreasts.tumblr.com/

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres: Impefect/Perfect Art

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres was a french painter. During his life,he realized a lot of work,but heconcentrated his attention on the portraits of women,in which he usually deformed a body part. For example,he realized ”The Great Odalisque” and ”The Valpincon baither”. In both of them,the back of women is not regular.

 

Christian Faur: The New Horizon of Pixel Art

What is pixel art? The pixel art is a form of digital art. It is a technique for constructing images that follows in the footsteps of the current divisionism (pointillism), whose greatest representative was Georges Seurat.
Nowadays there is a men,or better an artist who make pixel art but using crayons.
Here there is the source in which there are some images of Christian Faur ‘s works.


Kim Foster Gallery

 

Start a Body Revolution

After some magazines started talking about an alleged weight gain, the singer Lady GaGa opened up about her struggle with eating disorders. She also posted on her social network some photos in which she proudly show off her curvier body. This is the first step of her association Born This Way Foundation’ new campaign called Body Revolution 2013. This campaign is willing to celebrate young boys and girls’ body by posting a picture of their imperfection with explanatory captions.
Thousands of fans joined her battle cry by sharing photos of missing teeth, scars, evidences of eating disorder and so on.

Source: littlemonster.com

 

Eating Journey (Confessions of a Reformed Eater)

“Outside the commercial field, an amateur experience that has gained the attention of the Western media is the blog Eating Journey (Confessions of a Reformed Eater) led by Michelle Gay. In the ‘Exposed’ section this young woman proudly displays her body and invites other blog users to do the same. In response to this invitation many women (but also a few men) have posted photos of their bodies showing that they share the rejection of those models that lead them to despise their own image just because it differs from the glossy perfection that dominates the covers of fashion magazines. Users of Eating Journey instead want to celebrate their body, most interestingly in the practice introduced by Gay of highlighting presumed flaws such as a large belly with slogans like: ‘where I carried a healthy baby for 9 months’. Perfection is therefore increasingly seen as a false virtue, a feature common only to creatures confined to the fictional media world and as far from everyday reality as much as the protagonists of fairy tales or the heroes of Greek mythology. As pointed out by one of the bloggers that have exposed themselves: ‘The Beautiful at any cost, the Perfect in all the sauces, make us tired and bored, for the simple reason that they don’t belong to our earthly life of vulnerable and transient beings, constantly moved by errors and full of flaws and lacks of every kind. Imperfection is our natural habitat: a physical, moral and social imperfection.’”

Web Aesthetics, p. 249 – 250 (note: 39).

http://eatingjourney.com/exposed