The Bronze Sculptures Of Bruno Catalano

Le passager de la pluie
Bronze original – Tirage Limité à 12 exemplaires
(1/8 et épreuve d’artiste 1/4) 54 x 28 x18 cm

French artist Bruno Catalano has created an extraordinary series of eye-catching bronze sculptures called “Les Voyageurs” in Marseilles that depict realistic human workers with large parts of their bodies missing.


I think that the missing parts of the sculptures (their imperfections) make them truly extraordinary and unique.



From boredpanda
Bruno Catalano site

Giada Semeraro

About plastic surgery

Marie-Lou Desmeules is an artist who uses pure pigment to transform living models into bizarre sculptures of surreal celebrity lookalikes. Her work refers in particular to plastic surgery which often for some reason or another, didn’t exactly go as anticipated. We can read in her work a veiled complaint to reality television, which imposed this kind of beauty.

The art of glitches by Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar, is an artist from Canada. She uses images from encyclopedias, biology textbooks, featuring sexy pinups, children, politician-on-TV subject matters, but each gives off an air of american antiquity. Then search the glitch effect she wants by using a scanner; moving the image while that is being scanned, the results are distorted figures. “By mashing up these two technologies, I want to highlight the obsolescence of the old one and the future obsolescence of the new one”. She thinks that the most stylish pictures are the kitchest ones.

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

The beauty of diversity

Michelle Marshall is a french photographer. During her career she decided to document the incidence of the MC1R gene mutation responsible for red hair and freckles, particularly amongst black/mixed raced individuals of all ages. The gene is recessive, which means both parents need to have it, in order for the child to receive it. Marshall wanted to show the stereotype of the redhead is not representative for all people who enjoy their red strands. Her work is really interesting.

Christian Richter shows the beauty in ruins

“When I was young, I fell in love with abandoned buildings. After I got a camera as a present, I started photographing the beauty there. I mostly photograph empty buildings with great staircases or interiors.”

“I simply adore old decaying architecture, their patterns and textures – they remind me that everything is impermanent. Abandoned architecture photography is my ongoing project and I often travel around Europe looking for abandoned buildings.”


The photographer who normalizes women’s imperfect bodies

After a slew of instagram hate following her body positive imagery depicting women’s body hair went viral, it would have been easy for Seattle based photographer Ashley Armitage to take a step back from her bare-all approach to photography. But this online hate didn’t deter her from portraying a realistic, photoshop free depiction of the female form. Instead of bowing to the trolls, Armitage decided to push the boundaries of beauty standards further, shooting stretch marks, scars, spots and more.

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage

“I create images of the female body because historically these images have been controlled by men. We were always the painted and not the painters. I’m trying to take back what’s ours and explore what it means to have a body that has always been defined by a male hand”– Ashley Armitage


Play- Doh portraits by Jose Cardoso

Jose Cardoso’s work looks scary but surely it is really interesting.

“There’s a lot of theories about identity loss nowadays, about how social networks can help you fake your real identity, why do people use photoshop in order to hide imperfections but never use that tool to enhance deficiencies?”

This work could be refered also to how easy is to get plastic surgery to your face like it was made of Play-Doh.

These photos are open to a variety of interpretations.


Photosculptures by Brno del Zou

Brno del Zou is an artist and a photographer who uses an interesting fragment style which highlights all parts of a human face. In his “photosculptures” series, Brno Del Zou uses the fragmentation of the body in order to better understand it. The body and the faces are revisited and their volumes are highlighted in order to create installations of multiple scales. These “photosculptures” suggest a clear aesthetic preference which does not hide the chaotic side of our minds.

Awesome Split Personality Portraits Through Clever Styling

For a recent assignment, Sydney-based photographer Toby Dixon created these two awesome split personality portraits not with fancy Photoshop but with the help of two talented friends. Monique Moynihan, who was in charge of styling and Budi, who handled make-up, transformed a man and a woman each into two distinct halves.

Similar to a mullet, “business in the front, party in the back,” these side by side characters couldn’t be more different. While the studious, bow-tie and pearls-wearing side seems more than a little serious, the tattoo-sporting, red lipstick-wearing party side is all about letting loose.

Dixon proudly states about this project, “No cutting, no comping, no Photoshop trickery.”


Going over perfection’s idea

The korean Seung-Hwan Oh is a photographer and a microbiologist who suceed to combine these fields of work. In his serie Impermanence, he cultivates fungus that he applies to his film before he puts it into his camera. It consists in a serie of portraits which wants to go over the perfect and idealized pictures we see everywhere nowadays.

Distorted Scotch Tape Portraits by Wes Naman

One year ago, a New Mexico-based photographer Wes Naman was wrapping Christmas gifts with his assistant and started goofing around with the scotch tape. The artist immediately had an idea that after a year developed into the“Scotch Tape” portrait series, where volunteers put the tape around their faces to create terrifying and just absolutely hilarious expressions. Noses and lips get bent, and Wes also likes to stretch people’s eyebrows to make the eyes pop out – the final results are so bizarre that hardly any retouching is needed!


Can you read my face?

Two artists have created a portrait series of people who appear to have had cosmetic surgery.

However, the models’ nips and tucks are actually cut-outs from magazines.

Poking fun at the fashion industry, French artists Bruno Metra and Laurence Jeanson stick images of facial features, cut out from fashion magazines, over the models’ eyes, lips and noses to form new facial expressions.

Artists Perform Plastic Surgery With MagazinesModel
The artists say that the project, called ID, shows how beauty is no longer natural but socially conditioned.

Professional photographer Bruno Metra, 45, said: ‘In the media we are bombarded by images of others.

‘Magazines, cinema and television keep creating and imposing codes that become social references.



‘What one must look like, how to wear make-up, what clothes to wear, how to behave.

Laurence and I are fascinated by the power of the media and how it influences people’s identities.

‘The act of representation has taken over what’s real; models erase themselves in order to gain another self.

‘Here we are portraying identities weakened by the diktat of appearance.’


Shinichi Maruyama’s Nudes

Shinichi Maruyama exemplifies the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi–the beauty of things imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete. In his work, he captures the underlying principle of energetic interactions between forms. The artist first started halting the passage of time through images of suspended liquids forms intending to collide in mid-air. In his series Nudes, Maruyama has more recently collaborated with dancers to create a sense of motion in a single photograph, through layering different frames. In its spatial illusionism and meticulous details, he inevitably points to a vortex of visual forms and sensations, where spontaneity and control stand in perfect balance. The artist’s status lies in his ability to create a new abstract visual language that generates motion and stillness in perpetuum.


Sue Hotchkis’s use of Wabi-Sabi doctrine

“…my work is texture and surface, strongly influenced by the Japanese aesthetic of Wabi-Sabi. I seek out imperfection, in the insignificant and the overlooked, using a camera to freeze a moment in time, recording marks and surfaces that are in the process of breaking down, ephemeral, in a state of flux. ”


What Wabi-Sabi is? This word represents  a Japanese world view centered on the acceptiance of transience and imperfection.