The Bronze Sculptures Of Bruno Catalano

Le passager de la pluie
Bronze original – Tirage Limité à 12 exemplaires
(1/8 et épreuve d’artiste 1/4) 54 x 28 x18 cm

French artist Bruno Catalano has created an extraordinary series of eye-catching bronze sculptures called “Les Voyageurs” in Marseilles that depict realistic human workers with large parts of their bodies missing.

 

I think that the missing parts of the sculptures (their imperfections) make them truly extraordinary and unique.

 


 

From boredpanda
Bruno Catalano site

Giada Semeraro

About plastic surgery

Marie-Lou Desmeules is an artist who uses pure pigment to transform living models into bizarre sculptures of surreal celebrity lookalikes. Her work refers in particular to plastic surgery which often for some reason or another, didn’t exactly go as anticipated. We can read in her work a veiled complaint to reality television, which imposed this kind of beauty.

The art of glitches by Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar, is an artist from Canada. She uses images from encyclopedias, biology textbooks, featuring sexy pinups, children, politician-on-TV subject matters, but each gives off an air of american antiquity. Then search the glitch effect she wants by using a scanner; moving the image while that is being scanned, the results are distorted figures. “By mashing up these two technologies, I want to highlight the obsolescence of the old one and the future obsolescence of the new one”. She thinks that the most stylish pictures are the kitchest ones.

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

Sara Cwynar

The beauty of diversity

Michelle Marshall is a french photographer. During her career she decided to document the incidence of the MC1R gene mutation responsible for red hair and freckles, particularly amongst black/mixed raced individuals of all ages. The gene is recessive, which means both parents need to have it, in order for the child to receive it. Marshall wanted to show the stereotype of the redhead is not representative for all people who enjoy their red strands. Her work is really interesting.

Nancy Davidson’s sculptures challenge absurd body ideals

Nancy Davidson creates massive inflatable sculptures that resemble an unbridled body, ballooned and bulging. Combining pop culture kitsch with a feminist spirit and carnivalesque sense of humor, the artist specializes in a visceral language of bellies, bumps and lovely lady lumps, harnessing the bodily force of the human form in a minimalist range of colors and shapes.

Many of the sculptures begin with a weather balloon that the artist blows up with a nozzle. Then she goes to work, squeezing and binding and smushing the round orbs into various bodacious configurations.

For example, “Blue Moon” (below) resembles a belly and butt bursting from a corset trying desperately to restrain them, while another recalls fishnet stockings winding their way up impossibly long legs. Through abstraction, Davidson creates images so physical you may find yourself needing to swallow, as sometimes perusing erotic materials makes one forget to breathe.

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/feminist-artist-brings-minimalist-sculpture-to-bootylicious-new-heights_us_5748ad57e4b03ede4414d77a?utm_hp_ref=female-artists]

The photographer who normalizes women’s imperfect bodies

After a slew of instagram hate following her body positive imagery depicting women’s body hair went viral, it would have been easy for Seattle based photographer Ashley Armitage to take a step back from her bare-all approach to photography. But this online hate didn’t deter her from portraying a realistic, photoshop free depiction of the female form. Instead of bowing to the trolls, Armitage decided to push the boundaries of beauty standards further, shooting stretch marks, scars, spots and more.

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage bodies

Ashley Armitage

“I create images of the female body because historically these images have been controlled by men. We were always the painted and not the painters. I’m trying to take back what’s ours and explore what it means to have a body that has always been defined by a male hand”– Ashley Armitage

[http://www.dazeddigital.com/photography/article/29017/1/the-photographer-normalising-our-imperfect-bodies]

Play- Doh portraits by Jose Cardoso

Jose Cardoso’s work looks scary but surely it is really interesting.

“There’s a lot of theories about identity loss nowadays, about how social networks can help you fake your real identity, why do people use photoshop in order to hide imperfections but never use that tool to enhance deficiencies?”

This work could be refered also to how easy is to get plastic surgery to your face like it was made of Play-Doh.

These photos are open to a variety of interpretations.

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/play-doh-portraits-jose-cardoso_us_5734e23fe4b08f96c18294c4?utm_hp_ref=photography]

Photosculptures by Brno del Zou

Brno del Zou is an artist and a photographer who uses an interesting fragment style which highlights all parts of a human face. In his “photosculptures” series, Brno Del Zou uses the fragmentation of the body in order to better understand it. The body and the faces are revisited and their volumes are highlighted in order to create installations of multiple scales. These “photosculptures” suggest a clear aesthetic preference which does not hide the chaotic side of our minds.

Photo series by Sheila Pree morphs real women with Barbie

We’ve seen what a Barbie doll would look like if modeled after the average 19-year-old woman. But when you juxtapose a doll’s facial features with a real woman’s, the results are startling.

That’s what photographer Sheila Pree Bright did in her 2003 series “Plastic Bodies,” which is currently part of the traveling art show “Posing Beauty in African American Culture.” Pree Bright’s work focuses mostly on women of color, exploring their complex relationships to white beauty standards by combining images of real women’s bodies and faces with those of dolls.

“American concepts of the “perfect female body” are clearly exemplified through commercialism, portraying “image as everything” and introducing trends that many spend hundreds of dollars to imitate. It is more common than ever that women are enlarging breasts with silicone, making short hair longer with synthetic hair weaves, covering natural nails with acrylic fill-ins, or perhaps replacing natural eyes with contacts.

Even on magazine covers, graphic artists are airbrushing and manipulating photographs in software programs, making the image of a small waist and clear skin flawless. As a result, the female body becomes a replica of a doll, and the essence of natural beauty in popular American culture is replaced by fantasy.”

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/22/plastic-bodies-sheila-pree-bright-beauty-identity_n_4324403.html]

Awesome Split Personality Portraits Through Clever Styling

For a recent assignment, Sydney-based photographer Toby Dixon created these two awesome split personality portraits not with fancy Photoshop but with the help of two talented friends. Monique Moynihan, who was in charge of styling and Budi, who handled make-up, transformed a man and a woman each into two distinct halves.

Similar to a mullet, “business in the front, party in the back,” these side by side characters couldn’t be more different. While the studious, bow-tie and pearls-wearing side seems more than a little serious, the tattoo-sporting, red lipstick-wearing party side is all about letting loose.

Dixon proudly states about this project, “No cutting, no comping, no Photoshop trickery.”

[http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/toby-dixon-split-personality-portraits]

Who Know His Name?

Bansky it is one of the greatest exponents of street art. The artist’s real name is not known. His works are often satirical background and cover topics such as politics, culture and ethics. He manages to push through his ideas while remaining anonymous and not seeking fame. I consider it an imperfect beauty as the issues he deals with are often bloody and deep but who embody the whole spirit of contemporary street art.

1368655802-wall_piece_banksy_ippocampo_4 banksy-thug-flowers-mural-design real-banksy

Eleonora Formiconi

Bycicle Chains

Carolina Fontoura Alzaga , who wanders from landfill to landfill in search of old bikes , from which dissect pieces like circles and chains , and then build beautiful industrial chandeliers from classic form.
She makes these chandeliers because her passion for ecology.
After all this is art!

Chiara Barbera

It’s not easy… it’s never easy.

Giusy Versace is a well-known Italy’s champion para-athlete : She lost her legs in an accident, but she kept her persistance and determination.

Giusy Versace – www.giusyversace.it – Maurizio pighizzini

“It’s hard to confront yourself with the daily physical pain. Prosthetics, after all, aren’t your legs. So you wake up with a biting pain in different parts of your body,” the 30-something Italian says, pointing at her tummy and hips, “You can’t walk exactly like you walked yesterday. It’s different, every day.”

 

GIUSY VERSACE – WWW.GIUSYVERSACE.IT – Mjriam bon

 

Other Sources Gulf Times

 Giada Semeraro

Wood Horses

Heather Jansch realized some sculptures with pieces of wood taken from the sea or during her walk trough the nature.
She loves drawing and she loves horses. In 2000 she bought a house in a valley, in which she created a sculptures’ garden.
Twice a years she opens her house to people.

Chiara Barbera

Melting Ceramics

When dropping a ceramic plate or cup we’ve all braced for the familiar sound of impact as the object explodes into a multitude of sharp fragments on the kitchen floor. Artist Livia Marin imagines a wholly different demise for ceramic bowls, cups and tea pots in this series of work titled Broken Things (2009) and Nomad Patterns (2012).
Inexplicably, each piece seems to melt onto a surface while strangely retaining its original printed pattern. The designs are actually a Willow Pattern motif, a pastiche of Chinese landscape decoration created by an English man in the 1790s “as if” it were Chinese. She adds via email that the objects “appear as staged somehow indeterminately between something that is about to collapse or has just been restored; between things that have been invested with the attention of care but also have the appearance of a ruin.”

image image image image

Link: http://liviamarin.com/

CAROLINA MONACO

Custom Designs From The World

Melody Hames, 27, is a British artist and she has a very interesting job – she gives horses free-hand artistic haircuts.


This human behaviour helps them to get healthy.

She had to trim her pony frequently because it suffered from a condition called cushings, causing it to have a thick woolly coat which doesn’t change in the warmer season.

The horses she works on always look fabulous


CREDIT: FACEBOOK/JMC EQUESTRIAN CUSTOM CLIPPING

Interview and photos:
The Telegraph

 

But… What about eastern tradition?
Last week I saw some interesting pics about human life in Sahara, in which every camels are treated as a masterpiece.

But… This has provoked a great deal of criticism, because some people are completely against this attitude.

Dünya

From Arteide
Sahara Desert Morocco

PH : lginç meslekler 

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 Giada Semeraro

 

Cracked Log Lamps

Artist Duncan Meerding has crafted a beautiful line of lamps that can be used as stools or tables from salvaged logs that were considered to be imperfect because of the deep cracks and crevices within the wood and destined to be burned. Instead, Meerding used the imperfections to allow the light to playfully peek through, beautifully lighting the way indoors or out.
The Cracked Log Lamps are made from salvaged logs which would otherwise have been burnt. These lamps embrace, rather than avoid the naturally occurring cracks in refuse logs. By turning them into a vessel for light, we can bring the outside in, and be reminded of our intrinsic connection with nature. The warm yellow light coming through each lamps unique light pattern highlights the fiery fate that the salvaged timber would have otherwise been exposed to. These lamps embrace the cracks often avoided in timber based designs – pushing the light through the things often associated with darkness. Before turning on the Cracked Log Lamp, often a person would think it is purely just a log of wood.

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Chiara Barbera

Boudoir Disability

Valentina Tomirotti – Disability journalist – and Micaela Zuliani – professional photographer – wanted Boudoir Disability as a blog area and showcase images of disabled people who want to show their sexy appearance in spite of a body not perfect or simply not considered thi .

Boudoir Disability so strongly affirms that even an imperfect body is able to convey the passions, desires and emotions so as emotionally involved as any other.

 

LINK: http://www.disabilidoc.it/2016/02/10/sexy-si-scrive-con-la-d/

 

CAROLINA MONACO

‘We’ve Never Seen Anything Like This Before’

 

The World Heritage-listed reef is currently suffering its worst bleaching in recorded history with 93 percent of corals affected due to warming sea temperatures.

 

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 Barriera corallina in Belize – © WWF Canon

 “We’ve never seen anything like this scale of bleaching before,” – said Professor Terry Hughes, who convened a team of 300 scientists to study the bleaching. – “In the northern Great Barrier Reef, it’s like ten cyclones have come ashore all at once.” Following aerial surveys of 911 reefs, the scientists found that only 68 were completely intact and that almost a third were severely or entirely bleached. (from: The Telegraph )

 

close-up look at the Great Barrier Reef’s bleaching

( the whole article and photos: The Conversation )

April 12, 2016 9.12pm BST
Justin Marshall/coralwatch.org, Author provided
University of Queensland, Australia

Pictures show the silent death of many of these beautiful organisms. But, as noted above, the bleaching can in some cases be weirdly beautiful, as the corals shed their algal cloaks and reveal themselves

 

Giada Semeraro

After Bleaching,
sea-life on the reef. See more on
The Conversation

 

 

 

Miroslav Tichy

Miroslav Tichý , born 20 November 1926 in Kyjov he studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague . During the communist regime it was considered a dissident, after escaping from the police cecosl. Tichý realized in secret from 1960 to 1985 thousands of photos of women in his hometown of Kyjov, Czech Republic, with cameras built by hand with cardboard tubes, cans. aware of being photographed. Your photos in soft-focus and fleeting glimpses of women Kyjov are oblique , stained and poorly printed ; vitiated by the limits of its primitive equipment and a series of errors in the process of develo.

 

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LINK: http://marcocrupifoto.blogspot.it/2012/10/miroslav-tichy-artista-fotografo-e.html?m=0

 

CAROLINA MONACO