Bycicle Chains

Carolina Fontoura Alzaga , who wanders from landfill to landfill in search of old bikes , from which dissect pieces like circles and chains , and then build beautiful industrial chandeliers from classic form.
She makes these chandeliers because her passion for ecology.
After all this is art!

Chiara Barbera

Wood Horses

Heather Jansch realized some sculptures with pieces of wood taken from the sea or during her walk trough the nature.
She loves drawing and she loves horses. In 2000 she bought a house in a valley, in which she created a sculptures’ garden.
Twice a years she opens her house to people.

Chiara Barbera

When The Boxer Is a Painter

Omar Hassan is 29 years old, Italian mother Egyptian father. There’s color everywhere, from the sketches on his shoes and laptop because Omar is a painter. Omar boxa with the canvas. Dips his gloves in painting and tum-tum-tum, you hear the sound of fists on the canvas, an artistic gesture summarizing street art.

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Eleonora Formiconi

Dispatchwork

Jan Vormann is a German artist became famous thanks to a truly original idea: to fill the cracks of old walls, buildings and dilapidated structures with Lego bricks. The experiment, despite his art studies in Berlin, began during a visit to Rome by that time, thanks to his travels that have taken him around the world, has managed to put his signature everywhere. the aim is, through a satirical criticism, counter excessive seriousness of the citizens groups and to make them more cheerful and livable spaces.

Lego-Dispatchwork-Jan-Vormann-1 IMG_0367

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Eleonora Formiconi

Custom Designs From The World

Melody Hames, 27, is a British artist and she has a very interesting job – she gives horses free-hand artistic haircuts.


This human behaviour helps them to get healthy.

She had to trim her pony frequently because it suffered from a condition called cushings, causing it to have a thick woolly coat which doesn’t change in the warmer season.

The horses she works on always look fabulous


CREDIT: FACEBOOK/JMC EQUESTRIAN CUSTOM CLIPPING

Interview and photos:
The Telegraph

 

But… What about eastern tradition?
Last week I saw some interesting pics about human life in Sahara, in which every camels are treated as a masterpiece.

But… This has provoked a great deal of criticism, because some people are completely against this attitude.

Dünya

From Arteide
Sahara Desert Morocco

PH : lginç meslekler 

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 Giada Semeraro

 

The Art Of The Internet

By the term net art, which is also referred with Internet art, it refers to a contemporary artistic discipline aimed at creating works of art with, for and in the Internet. This art form has bypassed the traditional domain of the Museums and Galleries circuit, leaving the main role of the experience of aesthetic enjoyment to the Internet or other electronic networks. In many cases, viewing the work it is disintegrated in a particular kind of interaction with the artistic work. Artists working in this way are often called net artist. A well-known theorist Lev Manovich, net art, says it is “the materialization of social networks on the internet communications.” In fact the precursor group of this artistic movement has been able to create an artistic genre especially through its ability to create networks and connect programmers worldwide around a creative practice but also ironic. Net.art fact has played a lot with the parody, with error and with the disintegration of the web pages.

artinfo_wrongbiennial1 Frame-no.-0924-prints-on-alu-dibond-68x121cm-2011_2013-copyright-haleh-gallery-2014-1024x566

Revolutional Art

Arte Povera is a modern art movement. The term was coined by Italian art critic Germano Celant and introduced in Italy during the period of upheaval at the end of the 1960s, when artists were taking a radical stance. Artists began attacking the values of established institutions of government, industry, and culture.

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Michelangelo Pistoletto, Venere degli stracci, 1967

Eleonora Formiconi

Cementified Memory

In the 1980s, Burri created a form of land art project on the town of Gibellina in Sicily. The town was abandoned following the1968 Belice earthquake, with the inhabitants being rehoused in a newly built town 18 km away. Burri covered an area of over 120,000 square metres (1,300,000 sq ft), most of the old town, and an area roughly 300 metres by 400 metres with white concrete. He called this the Grande Cretto.

cretto-gibellina-alberto-burri

Eleonora Formiconi

Cindy Sherman: the masquerade of identity

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Untitled Film Still #15. 1978

Gelatin silver print, 9 7/16 x 7 1/2″ (24 x 19.1 cm).The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Barbara and Eugene Schwartz in honor of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder.© 2012 Cindy Sherman

 

The American feminist artist Cindy Sherman (1954)  “emerged onto the New York art scene in the early 1980s as part of a new generatio
n of artists concerned with the codes of representation in a media-saturated era” .
She posed in different stereotypical female roles, she’s got plenty of subjective emotions she can exploit through the media: In photograph after photograph, Sherman was ever present with different costumes. She wants to overturn the trend of the american society based on appearence and consumption,ready to celebrate the product and not its producer.

“Throughout her career, Sherman has appropriated numerous visual genres—including the film still, centerfold, fashion photograph, historical portrait, and soft-core sex image—while disrupting the operations that work to define and maintain their respective codes of representation.[…]

Cindy Sherman’s Untitled Film Stills (1977–80) have been canonized as a hallmark of postmodernist art, which frequently utilized mass-media codes and techniques of representation in order to comment on contemporary society.[…]  Sherman’s stills have an artifice that is heightened by the often visible camera cord, slightly eccentric props, unusual camera angles, and by the fact that each image includes the artist, rather than a recognizable actress or model.”

From: http://www.guggenheim.org/


Portraits
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Untitled #359. 2000

Chromogenic color print, 30 x 20″ (76.2 x 50.8 cm). Courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York. © 2012 Cindy Sherman

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Untitled #360. 2000

Chromogenic color print, 30 x 20″ (76.2 x 50.8 cm). Stefan T. Edlis Collection.
© 2012 Cindy Sherman
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Untitled #408. 2002

Chromogenic color print, 54 x 36″ (137.2 x 91.4 cm). Collection of Melva Bucksbaum and Raymond J. Learsy. © 2012 Cindy Sherman

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Untitled #132. 1984

Chromogenic color print, 67 x 47″ (170.2 x 199.4 cm). Collection of John Cheim.
© 2012 Cindy Sherman

With bright light and high-contrast color, Sherman focuses on the consequences of society’s stereotyped roles for women — in this case as a victim of fashion — rather than upon the roles themselves.

Giada Semeraro

Body Art: Shirin Neshat

Shirin Neshat  is an iranian artist of contemporary visual art, known for her work in film, video and photography.

Shirin looks beyond the role of the women, she wants to branch off in the pure identity of each people. The heart of her artistic search see the body as a way to communicate a social condition, the contrasts between Islam and the West, femininity and masculinity, public life and private life, antiquity and modernity..

She is able to shake us with mute stories.

From:
Gladstone gallery


Zarin Series, 2005 ; C-print 47 1/2 x 60 inches (120.7 x 152.4 cm)


Nida (Patriots), from The Book of Kings series, 2012 ; Ink on LE silver gelatin print 60 x 45 inches (152.4 x 114.3 cm)


Muhammed (Patriots), from The Book of Kings series, 2012
Ink on LE silver gelatin print 60 x 45 inches (152.4 x 114.3 cm)


Bahram (Villians), from The Book of Kings series, 2012 ; Ink on LE silver gelatin print      99 x 49 1/2 inches (251.5 x 125.7 cm)


Untitled, 1996 ; RC print & ink (photo taken by Larry Barns)

Giada Semeraro

NATHAN SAWAYA

nullOde to Andy . Plastic Bricks. 30 x 22 inches


Nathan Sawaya is an award-winning artist who creates awe-inspiring works of art out of some of the most unlikely things. His global touring exhibitions, THE ART OF THE BRICK, feature large-scale sculptures using only toy building blocks: LEGO® bricks to be exact. His work is obsessively and painstakingly crafted and is both beautiful and playful.

Previously a NYC corporate lawyer, Sawaya is the first artist to ever take LEGO into the art world and is the author of two best selling books. His unique exhibition is the first of its kind to focus exclusively on LEGO as an art medium and has broken attendance records around the globe. The creations, constructed from countless individual LEGO pieces, were built from standard bricks beginning as early as 2002.

Sawaya is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, recognizing his artwork and cultural achievements.  In 2014, with the belief that “art is not optional,” Sawaya founded The Art Revolution Foundation for the purpose of making art a priority in our schools and our homes. He has been a speaker at Google Zeitgeist, TEDx, Yahoo! and at the Clinton Library.

Nathan Sawaya has earned a top position in the world of contemporary art and has created a new dimension by merging Pop Art and Surrealism in awe inspiring and ground breaking ways. His art consists of playing with the material, color, movement, light and perspective.

For more information about Nathan Sawaya,

nathansawaya.com

www.brickartist.com


Human expression and Human condition show a collection of sculptures made with a brilliant technical quality, in which all the bricks used by Nathan, blend together pop art and surrealism. Human figures ascend to heaven, rip open walls, or despair : He built the emotions, brick by brick;  the creations, constructed from individual LEGO pieces has led to something incredible.


Everlasting. Plastic Bricks. 42 x 34 x 12 inches

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Kiss. Plastic Bricks. 27 x 21 x 20 inches

nullYellow. Plastic Bricks. 28 x 35 x 19 inches. Plastic Bricks. 45 x 15 x 11 inches

nullYellow Courtney. Plastic Bricks. 30 x 45 inches

nullHugman, Street Art Installation – New York City | Image Courtesy of Nathan Sawaya

null Faberge,The Big Egg Hunt – New York City, 2014 | Image Courtesy of Nathan Sawaya

Rashid Rana’s Multifaceted Imagery

“Working with multifaceted, multiplied imagery, Rashid Rana splits the visible universe apart in order to remake it anew. In sculpture, video and photographic prints, Rana transforms snapshots of shop signs in Lahore into abstracted cityscapes or renders reproductions of Old Master paintings as digital fields of colour. Utilising the grid structure, the artist has recently begun to rearrange famous paintings such as The Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus (1618) by Peter Paul Rubens and the Oath of the Horatii (1786) by Jacques Louis-David, scrambling these famous compositions into pixelated and codified puzzles.

Rana’s splicing and stitching technique can be carnal and violent, as in this ongoing series of brutally lacerated and reassembled Baroque and Neo-classical paintings, collectively known as the Transliteration Series. For his first solo exhibition in Italy, Rana has also reflected the legacy of the surrounding city in his source material, choosing paintings by artists hailing from Milan, such as Andrea Solari and Cesare da Sesto. While the originals are held in the Louvre in Paris and the National Gallery in London, Rana symbolically returns the images to the source of their creators, albeit visually distorted and temporally displaced in the process. Rana complicates and realigns such divided notions as figuration and abstraction, manipulation and reality, but also succeeds in knocking the world off its axis and transcending both traditional and technological means of communication.”

Source: lissongallery.com

“Stillness of Life”, C-print, 172.5 x 105 cm


“War Within”,C-print, 200 x 300 cm


“Notions of Narration II”,C-print, 228 x 323 cm

Installation view, Lisson Gallery, Milan

Adam Lister’s 8-bit Paintings

“The simplistic beauty of the “8-bit” work that emerged from the first days of digital are what inspire the artwork and paintings of Adam Lister. They capture the essence of the digital age, representing familiar images of culture and art in a format that is nostalgic and beautiful in its limitations. Lister’s collection of 8-bit-inspired portraits, reproductions and original works have been met with critical acclaim and tremendous excitement from collectors.”

Source: 8bits3dimensions.com


“Batman and Robin”, 7×10 inches watercolor


“Man of Steel”, 6×8 inches watercolor


“The Son of Man”, 5.5×7 inches watercolor


“American Gothic”, 7×8 inches watercolor

Jan Saudek and Sara Saudek

Decadent, extravagant, obscene: the great Czech photographer Jan Saudek together with Sarah Saudek – his model, wife and muse. Jan Saudek was Jewish and having been born in Prague, he lived through the horrors of deportation during World War II. On returning to Prague he was forced to work in secret, hidden in a cellar, where he developed dreams and fantasies whilst living under a rather grey and pragmatic dictatorship. In the seventies he began to “correct” his black and white prints tinting them with watercolours. In his exclusion this “underground man” created an art of dreams, beautifully sad and light: erotic in the most spirited and interesting way. The works of Saudek, are as fascinating and mysterious as Prague itself and have made him one of the greatest living authors. A pillar of twentieth century photographic history. The surreal world of Jan Saudek is a room with plaster peeling from the walls, which filters the infinite. The flesh of the annoyingly imperfect bodies, once exposed to his eye and brush are fashioned in to the unique and extraordinary, which only art can give to the underworld, by touches of melancholy and beauty. For her part Sarah Saudek tells of infinite decadence of femininity, that is impossible to  contain or restrict with a moralizing interpretive palate.

SaudekJan Saudek

Translated from Jan Saudek: la bellezza dell’imperfezione ~ Fotografia Artistica Blog G. Santagata

See also: Jan Saudek: the imperfection beauty

The Power Of Imperfection

The Renaissance man puts himself at the center of the world and loves to be represented in all his fair power, not separated by a certain hardness.Piero della Francesca painted in the face of Federico da Montefeltro the expression of a man who knows exactly what he wants. The shapes of body do not hide the strength, nor the effects of pleasure: the man of power, fat and dumpy when is not muscular, flaunts the signs of the power he exercises. While the aesthetic theory engages with the rules of proportion and symmetry of the body, the powerful men of the time are living a violation of these laws: the male figure also lends itself to enhance the freedom of the artist of the classical canons.
File:Piero, Double portrait of the Dukes of Urbino 02 480.jpg

Source: Cinemavvenire.it

Guernica

Guernica is a painting by Pablo Picasso. It was created in response to the bombing of Guernica, a Basque Country village in northern Spain by German and Italian warplanes at the behest of the Spanish Nationalist forces, on 26 April 1937, during the Spanish Civil War. The Spanish Republican government commissioned Picasso to create a large mural for the Spanish display at the Paris International Exposition at the 1937 World’s Fair in Paris.
Guernica shows the tragedies of war and the suffering it inflicts upon individuals, particularly innocent civilians. This work has gained a monumental status, becoming a perpetual reminder of the tragedies of war, an anti-war symbol, and an embodiment of peace. On completion Guernica was displayed around the world in a brief tour, becoming famous and widely acclaimed. This tour helped bring the Spanish Civil War to the world’s attention.

Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guernica_(painting)