Hundertwasser’s imperfect buildings

The use of tile, strong, primary colors and biomorphic forms is what represents artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who’s work is reflected not only in architecture, but applied in theory as well.

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Friedensreich Hundertwasser (1928–2000) was an Austrian painter, architect, and sculptor best known for his architecture. He initially gained acclaim for his paintings, but later became more renowned for his unique architectural styling.

In the 1950s, Hundertwasser began designing architectural projects.

His main focus was integrating natural aspects of the surrounding landscape into his one of a kind works, with the accent put not on the design itself but on the sensation created by it and the way it would reflect into the eyes of the viewer.

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The experiences offered by his creations transcend the linear, regular lines that modern architecture have established ( he considered a straight line the devil’s tool).

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The irregular forms of his works were considered to be more appropriate and better connected to the imperfect human nature.

His hunger for a better understanding of the human being led him to architecture focused on human, environmental friendly buildings, rejecting straight lines and functionalism that led to human misery, monotony and excessive rationality.

He considered that the man should stop trying to contain nature and that he, as part of the natural world, should coexist in harmony with the surroundings.

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All of his architectural projects included uneven floors, woods on the roof, vegetation.

Edward Honaker documents his own depression

Twenty one-year-old photographer Edward Honaker documents his own depression in powerful self-portraits. The series of black and white images illustrates the photographer’s experience with depression and anxiety.

In an attempt to raise awareness of the topic, Honaker says about the project:

Mental health disorders are such a taboo topic.

If you ever bring it up in conversation, people awkwardly get silent, or try to tell you why it’s not a real problem.

When I was in the worst parts of depression, the most helpful thing anyone could have done was to just listen to me – not judging, not trying to find a solution, just listen.

I’m hoping that these images will help open up conversation about mental health issues.

Everyone is or will be affected by them one way or another, and ignoring them doesn’t make things better. 

It’s kind of hard to feel any kind of emotion when you’re depressed, and I think good art can definitely move people”

Edward’s face is blurred or covered in all of the haunting black and white photos, which are meant to portray the helplessness felt by someone who is battling a depressive disorder. 

“All I knew is that I became bad at the things I used to be good at, and I didn’t know why” Edward recalled of the time before his diagnosis. Your mind is who you are, and when it doesn’t work properly, it’s scary” he noted. 

The Honaker’s series of mental illness portraits are a powerful reminder that while each individual’s experience with depression is personal, the feelings can be universal.

http://www.edwardhonaker.com/booktwo/

http://edwardandrew.tumblr.com/About

#DefineBeauty series by Nowness

Founded in 2010, Nowness is a video channel premiering the best in global arts and culture.

The channel’s programming strategy has established it as the go to source of inspiration and influence across art, design, fashion, beauty, music, food, and travel. They work with both established and emerging filmmakers which connect their audience to emotional and sensorial stories designed to provoke inspiration and debate.

The #DefineBeauty Series collects videos created for “unpicking the politics and prejudices of attraction”. 

#1 – Define Beauty: Les Fleurs by Saam Farahmand

Director Saam Farahmand heats up the body hair debate.

“One of the things I appreciate most about female beauty is what’s commonly appreciated the least” says Saam Farahmand of his ode to body hair that launches NOWNESS’ new five-part series #DefineBeauty. “I wanted to find something about women that was almost unanimously disliked.” The transformation of the female form from hairless ideal to glorious natural state is set to the rousing score of Minnie Riperton’s “Les Fleurs”.

“There was something so affecting about Minnie Riperton’s ability to breathe her gender—she speaks to female sexuality in a way that seems to exclude male consideration” says the London-based filmmaker.

 

#2 – Define Beauty: My Scars by Matthew Donaldson

Each disrupted surface has a story to tell: a heavily scarred man and his lover share their intimate thoughts in Matthew Donaldson’s “My Scars”.

Matthew Donaldson illuminates the narrative function of scars in this stripped-back portrait of British photographer Sam Barker, accompanied by intimate reflections from his lover.

 

#3 – Define Beauty: Beyond the Skin by Jonas Åkerlund

Director Jonas Åkerlund takes model Shaun Ross on a hyperkinetic trip through LA.

“Hollywood is so good at only seeing what’s on the outside, and using that first impression instead of going deeper” says Jonas Åkerlund of the location of the final film in the #DefineBeauty series, in which he follows American model and actor Shaun Ross around the back streets and freeways of Los Angeles. “I think Shaun has spent all his life with those reactions. Look again and you see that this guy is really beautiful.

His gothic style is apparent in today’s portrait of the famed albino model, who recently starred in Lana Del Rey’s 30 minute film, Tropico. “When Shaun showed up on Hollywood Boulevard, Darth Vader and Mickey Mouse were affronted” the filmmaker says of filming Ross. “Like, ‘What the fuck is this guy doing here?”.

 

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